Film, Television & Media

Program Overview

 

The  Film, Television and Media Arts major and minor provides students with a detailed understanding of the visual, creative, and communicative power of various media through courses in theory, history, genres, styles, and structures in a collaborative, hands-on environment. Media Center Facilities 

 

The program's curriculum focuses on merging traditional media with new media, opening a world of exploration and creative possibilities. Students learn and apply the theories and practices of visual and audio storytelling including writing, design, production, cinematography, sound design, digital imaging and editing.

In addition, other student production resources are available.  These are STAGSTV, a student run television station and  Cinefest, a competition for student films.

Benefiting from the personal attention offered by our faculty, you are mentored and led to understand the expressive power media holds while experimenting in order to find your creative voice, imagination and vision. As a discipline that requires constant practice and application, you are required to create an annual extracurricular production project. This helps develop collaborative partnerships and apply the knowledge you've acquired throughout the school year.

          

 

Program at a Glance

Number of Majors

  • We have 100 majors, approximately 25 a year

 No Prior Experience Required

  • but passion and dedication is expected

 A Flexible Curriculum

  • majors take 12 courses, including screenwriting, history of American and World Cinema, producing, directing, camera, audio, lighting, editing, and post production

 Students Pursue Interests in Production, Screenwriting, and Cinema Studies

  • after taking the first six introductory courses of the program

 We Provide Close Mentoring

  • of each student, with cura personalis (care of the whole person, in Jesuit terms)

 Our Students Join a Close, Creative Community

  • of peer, faculty and staff film and media makers

 Our Full Time Faculty

  • are film practitioners and theorists

 Media Professionals in the Media Center

  • also teach in our program and are available to students for support, advice, and instruction

 Extraordinary Sophisticated Equipment, Software and Other Resources

  • are plentiful and available to all majors in the award-winning Media Center, home of the program

 First Year Students

  • begin the program immediately in the Fall with an introductory course,  attend the weekly Freshman Seminar (for socialization with the program and bonding with one another), and work on Fall projects with upperclassmen

 All Students Work on Projects

  • and receive credit by enrolling in the required FTM Production Practicum course (1 credit at least once a year), gaining experience and credit while working on independent projects for fellow students, projects for the Media Center, Fairfield's student television channel, or capstone seniors

 Independent Projects are Encouraged

  • outside of class, with faculty supervision, including freshman year

 Senior Capstone Projects, Screenplays, or Cinema Studies Papers

  • are developed and produced in a two-semester capstone course

 Internships are Readily Available

  • nearby in New York and Connecticut - in film, television and media production

 Many Graduates are Working in the Industry

Requirements

See Film, Televsion and Media Arts course descriptions from our catalog for more information 

Film, Television & Media Arts Major

For a 39 credit major students must complete the following:

Foundation Sequence (18 Credits):

  • FTM 10: Introduction to Film Studies
  • FTM 11: Introduction to Film and Video Production
  • FTM 120: Beginning Screenwriting for Film and Television
  • FTM 130: Nonlinear Editing for Film and Television
  • FTM 131: Intermediate Film and Video Productio

Plus one of these survey history/analysis courses (3 credits):

  • FTM 101: American Cinema: History and Analysis - OR -
  • FTM 102: American Television: History and Analysis

Advanced Sequence (18 Credits):

Complete one of these survey history/analysis courses (3 credits):

  • FTM 103: World Cinema - OR -
  • FTM 104: Documentary Cinema

Complete one history/analysis course at 200- or 300-level (3 credits):

  • FTM 201: Filmmaker Studies
  • FTM 204 African American Cinema
  • FTM 205/MU 245: Survey of Film Music - “Hearing the Movies”
  • FTM 206: American Films: Decades (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 207: Film Genres (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 208: Television Genres (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 209 Gender, Sexuality, and Cinema (H)
  • FTM 210: Special Topics in Film, Television & Media Arts (H)

*additional 200- or 300-level courses in other departments may satisfy this requirement (see below)


Complete two electives in applied production, writing, or history/analysis: (6 Credits)

  • FTM 101: American Cinema: History and Analysis
  • FTM 102: American Television: History and Analysis
  • FTM 103: World Cinema: Fiction
  • FTM 104: Documentary Cinema
  • FTM 108: Sports Broadcasting and Remove TV Production
  • FTM 201: Filmmaker Studies (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 204: African American Cinema
  • FTM 205/MU 245: Survey of Film Music - “Hearing the Movies”
  • FTM 206: American Films: Decades (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 207: Film Genres (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 208: Television Genres (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 209: Gender, Sexuality, and Cinema (H)
  • FTM 210: Special Topics in Film, Television & Media Arts (H)
  • FTM 220: Intermediate Screenwriting for Film and Television (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 230: Lighting and Cinematography
  • FTM 231: Documentary and Experimental Film Production
  • FTM 232: Studio Television Production
  • FTM 234: Directing for Film and Television
  • FTM 235: Digital Motion Graphics
  • FTM 236/MU 202: Digital Audio Workstation
  • FTM 237/TA 231: Acting for the Camera

Complete two capstone courses: (6 Credits)

  • FTM 310: Capstone Seminar I
  • FTM 311: Capstone Seminar II

Complete either fall or spring semester during freshman, sophomore, and junior years: (3 credits)

  • FTM 90: Production Practicum in Film, Television, & Media Arts (1 credit)

* courses in other departments that satisfy third history/analysis requirement:

  • CI 251: New Chinese Cinema (3 Credits)
  • IT 271: Italian Cinema (3 Credits)
  • SP 271: Hispanic Film (3 Credits)

Film, Television & Media Arts Minors

There are two FTM minor tracks, one in Studies and one in Production.

FTM Minor in Film, Television, and Media Studies – (18 credits)

  • FTM 10: Introduction to Film Studies
  • FTM 11: Introduction to Film Production
  • FTM 101: American Cinema: History and Analysis OR FTM 102: American Television: History and Analysis
  • 3 electives from the following:
    • FTM 103: World Cinema
    • FTM 104: Documentary Cinema
    • FTM 201: Filmmaker Studies
    • FTM 204: African American Cinema
    • FTM 205/MU 245: Survey of Film Music
    • FTM 206: American Films: Decades
    • FTM 207: Television Genres
    • FTM 209: Gender, Sexuality, and Cinema
    • FTM 210: Special Topics in Film, Television & Media Arts

FTM Minor in Film, Television, and Media Production – (19 credits)

  • FTM 10: Introduction to Film Studies
  • FTM 11: Introduction to Film and Video Production
  • FTM 120: Beginning Screenwriting for Film and Television
  • FTM 130: Nonlinear Editing for Film & TV
  • FTM 131: Intermediate Film and Video Production
  • 1 elective from the following:
    • FTM 230: Lighting and Cinematography
    • FTM 231: Documentary and Experimental Film Production
    • FTM 232: Studio Television Production
    • FTM 234: Directing for Film and Television
    • FTM 235: Digital Motion Graphics
    • FTM 236/MU 202: Digital Audio Workstation
    • FTM 237/TA 231: Acting for the Camera
    • FTM 90: Production Practicum in Film, Television & Media Arts (1 credit)

Course Offerings

See Film, Television and Media Arts course descriptions from our catalog for more information 

  • FTM 10: Introduction to Film Studies (H)
  • FTM 11: Introduction to Film and Video Production (A)
  • FTM 90: Production Practicum in Film, Television & Media Arts (A)
  • FTM 101: American Cinema: History and Analysis (H)
  • FTM 102: American Television: History and Analysis (H)
  • FTM 103: World Cinema (H)
  • FTM 104: Documentary Cinema (H)
  • FTM 108: Sports Broadcasting and Remote Television Production (A)
  • FTM 109: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Cinema (H)
  • FTM 110: Special Topics in Film, Television & Media Arts (H)
  • FTM 120: Beginning Screenwriting for Film and Television (A)
  • FTM 131: Introduction to Production (A)
  • FTM 201: Filmmaker Studies (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 204: African American Cinema (H)
  • FTM 205/MU 245: Survey of Film Music - "Hearing the Movies" (H)
  • FTM 206: American Films: Decades (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 207: Film Genres (H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 208: Television Genres (H)
  • FTM 209: Gender, Sexuality, and Cinema (H)
  • FTM 210: Special Topics in Film, Television and Media Arts (H/A)
  • FTM 220: Immediate Screenwriting (A)
  • FTM 230: Lighting and Cinematography (A)
  • FTM 231: Documentary and Experimental Film Production (A)
  • FTM 232: Studio Television Production (A)
  • FTM 234: Directing for Film and Television (A)
  • FTM 235: Digital Motion Graphics (A)
  • FTM 236/MU 202: Digital Audio Workstation (A)
  • FTM 237/TA 231: Acting for the Camera (A)
  • FTM 305: Independent Study in Film, Television & Media Arts (A/H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 306: Internship in Film, Television & Media Arts (A/H) (may be taken twice)
  • FTM 310: Senior Capstone Seminar I (A/H)
  • FTM 311: Senior Capstone Seminar II (A/H)

Faculty

Director

Faculty

Patrick Brooks

Assistant Professor

Visual & Performing Arts

Visiting Assistant Professors

Lecturers

Davis
DiPirro
Fresko

VPA Coordinator

Melissa Roberto
CNS 3
Ext. 2459

Production Resources

Fairfield U student working behind the scenes during a Stags sporting event.

 

The Film, Television and Media Arts program is served and supported in its home at Fairfield's innovative Media Center, a 15,000 square foot facility on the ground floor of Xavier Hall, consisting of:

  • 2 fully equipped HD television studios and control rooms
  • a large mobile satellite uplink production truck
  • 3 non-linear editing suites, 30 editing stations
  • 2 media class and HD screening rooms
  • a digital imaging lab
  • an equipment cage with over 30 HD and SD cameras, lighting packages, audio equipment, dollies, steadicams, jib arms and grip equipment
  • offices for 16 Media Center personnel who are professional writers, producers, directors, cinematographers, editors and new media artists - many of whom teach in the program
  • offices for Film, Television and Media Arts faculty
  • the Resource Center for Advanced Digital Exploration (RCADE), providing workshops for students, staff and faculty on new media production methods and tools

Program resources:







Internships

Fairfield U interns help out with an on court basketball interview.

 

 Students in the major or minor program are encouraged to seek out internship opportunities in the area of their concentration of film, television or media arts. Internships are available from many production companies, as well as television stations. Our faculty have many contacts with practitioners in these media and often help qualified students arrange internships for credit. Fairfield's proximity to New York City (just an hour away) makes dynamic options a real possibility. In recent years, for example, our students have held internships at NBC, ABC, ESPN, The Daily Show, MSG, Speedvision Network, Outdoor Life, CNN, Comedy Central, The Conan O'Brien Show, WFAN, ESPN, WEBE 108, National Geographic Film and Television, and numerous independent film production companies.

Students on set at a film internship.   Student posing for a picture while on set.

What are the Qualifications?

Credit-bearing internships in film, television and media arts are only available to declared junior and senior major and minor students in the New Media Film, Television and Radio program, who have taken FTM10 & FTM11 and at least one history/theory course and two applied production courses in your respective media track. Exceptions to these requirements can be appealed to the director of the Film, Television and Media Arts program. The internship counts as an elective course within the major and minor program.

Internships are meant for students who have some basic understanding of the media, enabling them to both better appreciate the work in which they intern as well as to make them more useful to the company in which they intern. Because of the demands that an internship places upon a professor in the Film, Television and Media Arts program, we cannot accommodate students who are not in the major or minor program.

 

FU student ready to give a presentation.   Students work behind the scenes for a television station.

What should I expect (and not to expect) from an internship?

Internships are designed to give you a real-world experience of a particular field of work. At the least (or the most!), you should have an experience of "trying on the clothes" of the field, to see if they "fit" your talents, interests, and your sense of who you might be in the future.

Most internships at larger companies do not allow you the chance to do much else, and often give you pretty basic work to do - sometimes not even related to the field. If you work for MTV, for example, don't expect to be learning about how to shoot or edit a segment: your main job may be to control the crowds outside the studio windows in Times Square. It's not because they don't like you, it's just that they do not have the time to teach you any particular skills (and the union contracts do not allow you to even touch the equipment). If you intern in a smaller, less sexy place, you may indeed be taught some real skills that will advance you in some area of the media. Smaller companies usually have greater needs than large ones, and often rely on interns to an amazing degree.

You should also not expect to be offered a job sometime in the future at your internship company, especially at the larger companies. They simply don't have that many jobs available, and often have many interns, whom they mainly use for drudge work. Again, there is a better chance at a smaller place that they may like you so much - and appreciate your skills - that they will offer you a job upon graduation. It happens, but don't walk into the internship with that expectation. Your internship will be successful if you get a good look at how the professionals practice their crafts and how good a fit working with them feels to you. The requirements for the internship are designed to help achieve that end.

Life After Fairfield

‌Film, Television and Media Arts Program alumni carry their skills and awareness of the aesthetic, artistic, and communicative powers of media delivery into the professional world. In recent interviews they offer insight into what they learned in the program that enabled their success and also offer advice to make the most of your learning experience in the Film, Television and Media Arts Program.

Fairfield U media truck   Two students pose outside of a blue media helicopter

Many graduates continue to develop their interests and perfect their skill through graduate studies, and have gone on to film school programs at:

  • New York University
  • Columbia
  • University of Southern California

The major in Film, Television and Media Arts provides a great introduction to the professional world of these media. Our graduates are working in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and other media centers around the nation:

  • Late Night with David Letterman
  • FOX News
  • MSNBC
  • MTV
  • Jon Stewart Show
  • Comedy Central
  • New Line Cinema
  • Twentieth Century Fox
  • Paramount Pictures
  Alumni Interviews Video on Patrick Camden, Fairfield U student.

 

Learn more about how the University's Career Planning Center can support your post-graduate goals, and how Fairfield's tight-knit alumni network can build career and mentoring opportunities that last a lifetime.

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