Partners & Projects

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Existing Partnerships

Green Village Initiative

Green Village Initiative is a non-profit in Bridgeport, Connecticut whose mission is to grow food, knowledge, leadership and community, through urban gardening and farming, to create a more just food system in Bridgeport

United Way of Western Connecticut

To improve the lives of hard-working, struggling households by mobilizing the resources of local communities to create lasting change

Catholic Charities of Fairfield County

Puts faith into action by providing Food, Housing, Mental Health, Adoption, Immigration, Family Support Services to the needy and vulnerable of all faiths in Fairfield County

The Council of Churches of Greater Bridgeport

A faith-based, non-sectarian social services agency dedicated to meeting the needs of people at risk and breaking the cycle of poverty and crisis in the Greater Bridgeport area; committed to educating children, feeding the hungry, supporting youth in crisis, guiding former offenders and building bridges of understanding between all faiths

Conect

A collective of churches, synagogues, mosques, temples, and civic organizations from New Haven and Fairfield Counties – representing more than 20,000 people from different races, faith backgrounds, and living in both cities and suburbs – that have joined together to take action on social and economic justice issues of common concern

Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance

A proud to partner with the Justice Advisors: young leaders stepping up to bring their own experiences and expertise to stakeholder tables.

Current And Past Projects

Room To Grow — Norwalk, CT

The purpose of this research was to visually display the population distribution of, as well as linkages between our variables; with the hopes that our maps would legibly illustrate correlations and patterns between specific demographic identifiers. Thus, in doing so, the maps would highlight areas of acute need that are perhaps being unmet, and, further, prompt one to reflect and critically engage with not only the question of why social inequalities persist in these affected neighborhoods, but also confront the question of what can be implemented to better serve the everyday needs of these particularly vulnerable groups on the margins. The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that annually provides demographic information on the American population. The results of the ACS and surveys of equal caliber are valuable in a number of fields, ranging from social services organizations, both governmental and non-profit, social research studies, such as this one and even potentially reaches the top—ultimately influencing the way local, state and even federal governments may allocate funding into sectors, such as labor, education, businesses, social services, public works and infrastructure. For the purposes of this research assignment, our team utilized the latest census data from the American Community Survey by geocoding it and visually displaying it via maps that illustrate patterns of, as well as interactions between, any given variables that we explored, that being: measures of poverty, immigration, education, income family composition, age, race and ethnicity.

Making A Difference: Economic Impact Analysis

Since 1985, Habitat for Humanity of Coastal Fairfield County (Habitat CFC) has built decent, affordable houses for over 200 deserving families – which is an endeavor that has a life-changing impact on those families. This analysis demonstrates that there are ripple effects that spill-over throughout the community: there is a benefit to the broader neighborhood in the form of property value impact for properties proximate to the new home. Additionally, as a contributor to the local economy, the activities of Habitat CFC create a wave of economic benefit that extends beyond the immediate construction costs.

Food Access — Stamford, CT: Demographic & Survey Research

The purpose of this research was to visually display the population distribution of, as well as linkages between our variables; with the hopes that our maps would legibly illustrate correlations and patterns between specific demographic identifiers. Thus, in doing so, the maps would highlight areas of acute need that are perhaps being unmet, and, further, prompt one to reflect and critically engage with not only the question of why social inequalities persist in these affected neighborhoods, but also confront the question of what can be implemented to better serve the everyday needs of these particularly vulnerable groups on the margins.

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that annually provides demographic information on the American population. The results of the ACS and surveys of equal caliber are valuable in a number of fields, ranging from social services organizations, both governmental and non-profit, social research studies, such as this one and even potentially reaches the top—ultimately influencing the way local, state and even federal governments may allocate funding into sectors, such as labor, education, businesses, social services, public works and infrastructure. For the purposes of this research assignment, our team utilized the latest census data from the American Community Survey by geocoding it and visually displaying it via maps that illustrate patterns of, as well as interactions between, any given variables that we explored, that being: measures of poverty, immigration, education, income family composition, age, race and ethnicity.

Resources

Center for Social Impact staff and the Faculty Chair of CEnR are available for one-to-one consulting on project ideas, CEnR methodologies, and available research tools. The Center will be developing a host of resources and workshops – for faculty, students, and community partners -- to support and advance CEnR. The College of Arts & Sciences Fredrickson Family Innovation Lab, located in the Academic Commons, is also great resource to the campus.

How to Develop CEnR Proposal

Have an idea? Please fill out our Community Partner Interest Form. If you have any questions please contact Jonathan Delgado, Assistant Director for CEnR, at jonathan.delgado@fairfield.edu, x3415.

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