Exhibitions

Fairfield University Art Museum

Exhibitions

The Fairfield University Art Museum presents four to six temporary exhibitions annually in the Bellarmine Hall Galleries and the Walsh Gallery. These exhibitions survey a wide swath of centuries and cultures, from the ancient world to modern and contemporary, and are accompanied by an array of educational programming for all audiences. 
Piece from Mizusashi: Japanese Water Jars from the Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz Collection

Mizusashi: Japanese Water Jars from the Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz Collection

Bellarmine Hall Galleries

June 5, 2018 - December 14, 2018

A mizusashi is a utensil used in the Japanese tea ceremony, a tradition with medieval origins that is still widely practiced today. In a tea gathering, a host prepares bowls of tea by whisking together powdered green tea and hot water drawn from a kettle. The mizusashi, typically an earthenware or stoneware jar, holds the water used to replenish the kettle and rinse the bowls. The first utensil to enter the room and the last to leave, the mizusashi is a locational and aesthetic anchor for the gathering and can take a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and appearances. This selection of 20th- and 21st-century mizusashi highlights two important trends-the perpetuation of longstanding tea traditions alongside the artistry and technical excellence that define modern Japanese ceramics.

Image © Katsumata Chieko

Piece from Collateral Damage collection

Mohamad Hafez
Collateral Damage

Walsh Gallery, Quick Center for the Arts

October 26 – December 15, 2018

Born in Damascus, raised in Saudi Arabia, and educated in the Midwestern U.S., artist and architect Mohamad Hafez explores the impact of the political turmoil of the Middle East through hyper-realistic streetscapes crafted from found objects, paint, and scrap metal. Architectural in appearance yet politically charged in content, his miniaturized tableaus are alternately nostalgic, charming, and deeply painful.

Mohamad Hafez: Collateral Damage features a selection of work across multiple projects, including the site-specific installation Sea Garbage, as well as pieces from his Baggage series, in which the artist creates tableaus suggestive of the experience of refugees – many of whom are forced to flee their homes at short notice, or with only as much as they can carry – and places them inside vintage suitcases.

This exhibition also features selected works by two contemporary Syrian artists, photographer and digital artist Hala el-Abed and filmmaker Waref abu Quba, which explore themes of violence and loss centered around the Syrian refugee crisis.

Image: Mohamad Hafez, Hiraeth, 2017. Plaster, paint, rusted metal, found objects, rigid foam. 60 x 32 x 17 inches. © Mohamad Hafez.

Piece from The Collections of Alfred James Tulk: Liberia, 1931-33

Liberia, 1931-33
The Collections of Alfred J. Tulk

Bellarmine Hall Galleries

September 14 - December 14, 2018

Many important collections of West African art trace their origins to the state of Connecticut. This exhibition highlights objects acquired in the early 1930s by Connecticut artist Alfred James Tulk of Stamford.

Born in London in 1899, Alfred Tulk studied art at Oberlin Art College and then Yale University, from where he earned his BA in 1923. Tulk is best known for his public mural paintings, stained glass windows, and mosaics, many of which he completed during his tenure at the Rambusch Decorating Company in New York City. Between 1925 and 1954, he painted over 300 large murals for theatres, churches, hotels, restaurants, and private homes in the United States.

In 1931, Alfred Tulk and his wife, Ethel Tulk, traveled from their home in Connecticut to rural Liberia, where they spent one year living and working in Ganta at the American Methodist mission station established there in 1926 by Tulk's close friend, medical missionary Dr. George W. Harley. While in Liberia, Tulk assembled a small but important collection of masks, statues, and other objects of daily use and material culture a number of which have been re-assembled for this exhibition. He also created a portfolio of portrait drawings and oil paintings which he created in situ of local subjects from the region around Ganta. The exhibition will include several of Tulk's own artworks, as well as some of his field photographs, his map of Liberia, selected correspondence, and a copy of his original handwritten field diary.

Upcoming Exhibitions

Exhibitions are planned 2-3 years in advance and are listed here once dates, venue, and other details are confirmed. (We regret that we are unable to accept unsolicited exhibition proposals.)

Past Exhibitions

The Fairfield University Art Museum was founded in the fall of 2010 as the Bellarmine Museum of Art. The museum changed its name in the fall of 2016. All of the past exhibitions of the museum and the Walsh Gallery (which was operated independently until 2013) are listed here. To access and download digital materials for exhibitions since 2010 you can access the museum’s digital archive.

Traveling Exhibitions

Traveling exhibitions are first planned and shown at the Fairfield University Art Museum, then lent to other institutions for temporary installation.

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