Summer Scholars Program

Summer Scholars 2019 dates: July 7 - July 19

Summer Scholars applications for Summer 2019 will be accepted starting January 15, 2019. Below are details from our 2018 program for your reference.

A two-week college residential and academic experience for talented high school students

Welcome! Engaged and curious high school students looking to get a taste for what college is really like are encouraged to apply to the Fairfield University Summer Scholars Program.

Fairfield University Summer Scholars Program is a great way for rising junior and senior high school students to obtain a dynamic college experience during the summer. Students can select from a wide array of courses in the sciences, arts, humanities, or the social sciences.

 

Program Highlights:

  • 3-credit college transfer credits and transcript*
  • Small class settings led by expert faculty
  • A full (and fun!) college, residential experience
  • Access to Fairfield's safe and scenic campus environment and amenities
  • One-on-one meetings to discuss academic progress and successful course completion
  • Workshops to discuss the college search process and other related topics

2018 Course List:

  1. Biology: Identity and the Human Genome
  2. Chemistry: Introduction to Forensic Science
  3. Economics: Introduction to Microeconomics
  4. Engineering: STEM Guitar
  5. English: Creative Writing
  6. Psychology: General Psychology
  7. Studio Art: Alternative Processes Photography


Contact us at summerscholars@fairfield.edu for any questions about our program.

* In many cases, credits earned through Fairfield University will be accepted at other institutions. Fairfield University cannot guarantee that credits earned on our campus will be transferable to other Universities. Therefore, students and their families are encouraged to check with individual schools regarding the transferability of Fairfield University credits.

Program Admission

The Summer Scholars Program is open to qualified rising junior and senior high school students.  Students should have a cumulative high school GPA of 3.2 or higher to apply to the program; however, applications are reviewed on an individual basis, so all interested applicants are encouraged to apply.

Program Cost of $3,410 includes:

  • Tuition* (one 3-credit college course) and
  • Room and Board (all meals and enrichment programming)

Applications accepted starting January 31, 2018

‌T‌o apply, please follow these steps: 

  1. Fill out and submit the online application form and $60 dollar application fee.**
  2. Print the Guidance Counselor or Teacher Recommendation form. Once completed, this may be mailed directly to Fairfield University by your recommender, or you may mail together with additional items below.
  3. Write a one-page personal essay that includes why you are interested in participating and what you hope to achieve with this program.
  4. Obtain a copy of the student's official transcript.
  5. Print and complete the Housing and Medical form
  6. If you require disability or support services while on campus, please review our website for our policies, and then contact us at summerscholars@fairfield.edu with your specific needs.

All of the materials listed above must be received for your application to be reviewed. You may mail the letter of recommendation, peronal essay, official transcript and housing/medical form to: 

Fairfield University
Summer Scholars Program: Attn. Sandy Richardson
CAS Dean’s Office, CNS 100
1073 North Benson Road
Fairfield, CT  06824

You may also e-mail the above materials to:  Summerscholars@fairfield.edu
Questions may be e-mailed to the address above or call 203-254-4000 ext. 2911.

Applications will be accepted until June 30, 2018.
Admission notification will be via e-mail within one week of receipt of all admission materials.

*The Trustees of the University reserve the right to change tuition rates and make additional changes whenever necessary.
**Application fee is non-refundable. Upon acceptance to the Summer Scholars Program, application fee will be credited to total program cost.

Program Courses

Students in the Summer Scholars Program will take one 3-credit course during the two-week period that will meet Monday through Friday for three hours a day.

Students in this program will take classes alongside current college students and are expected to complete approximately five hours of pre-work through an online communication website prior to the beginning of class. This may include discussion boards, papers, or another way that students can demonstrate their knowledge.

Successful course completion requires dilligence and organization. Students in the program have many opportunities to study for their courses during the day and evening while Summer Scholars facilitators provide weekly one-on-one meetings to gauge how each student is handling the course. In addition, we encourage students to visit their professors during their office hours to ensure they are on track to complete their course.

*Course offerings are subject to change. Contact us at summerscholars@fairfield.edu with any questions.

2018 Course Options 

  1. Biology: Identity and the Human Genome
    Professor Olivia Harriott

    This course introduces scientific and social aspects of human genetics. Topics of discussion include the structure and function of genes, human genetic diversity, Mendelian inheritance, and the ethical and legal issues related to emerging genetic technologies.

  2. Chemistry: Introduction to Forensic Science
    Professor Amanda Harper-Leatherman

    This course provides an introduction to the scientific techniques used for the analysis of common types of physical evidence encountered at crime scenes. Using critical thinking and laboratory experiences, students become crime scene investigators. They are charged with the task of solving a mock crime. The investigations include fabric analysis, ink analysis, blood analysis, DNA analysis, fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and/or blood alcohol analysis. The lecture part of the course focuses on exploring the underlying chemical principles behind the techniques and includes discussion of historical case studies.

  3. Economics: Introduction to Microeconomics
    Professor Philip Lane
    This course analyzes the behavior of individual consumers and producers as they deal with the economic problem of allocating scarce resources. The course examines how markets function to establish prices and quantities through supply and demand, how resource costs influence firm supply, and how variations in competition levels affect economic efficiency. Topics may include antitrust policy, the distribution of income, the role of government, and environmental problems. The course includes computer applications.

  4. Engineering: STEM Guitar
    Professor Ryan Munden and Dominic Figueiredo
    Build your own electric guitar! This course looks at the design elements, manufacturing and assembly of solid-body electric guitars. Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) concepts that relate directly to guitars are used to help students make an applied learning connection.  Each student will construct their own electric guitar.  Course will cover wood species and the environment, guitar headstock design features, chemistry of finishes, math applications in a guitar, physical science aspects of the guitar such as mechanical systems, concepts of sound waves, string tension, fretboard layout, intonation, and electronics.  Studio-style class, lecture and lab time combined throughout course. There may be an additonal lab fee to cover materials.

  5. English: Creative Writing
    Professor Laura Marciano

    This course will develop creativity and critical thinking through various writing exercises in the composition of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, digital writing, and hybrid forms. Students will complete both informal and formal assignments, utilize directives for process writing, and keep daily journals. This course will present information on the context of each genre's important histories, authors, and communities, and information on editing and publishing. Students will participate in a writing workshop and complete a final portfolio of three complete works.

  6. Psychology: General Psychology
    Professor Michael Creane

    This course introduces the science of mental processes and behavior by addressing a range of questions including: How is brain activity related to thought and behavior? What does it mean to learn and remember something? How do we see, hear, taste, and smell? How do we influence one another's attitudes and actions? What are the primary factors that shape a child's mental and emotional development? How and why do we differ from one another? What are the origins and most effective treatments of mental illness?

  7. Studio Art: Alternative Processes Photography
    Professor Jed Post
    This course covers alternative techniques in photography, including Cyanotypes, Kallitypes, collage, and instant photography. Additionally, students will have readings pertaining to the history of the medium, and will be introduced to contemporary concepts and use of the photographic image. A digital camera, while not required, will be useful. There are a small number of manual and digital loaner cameras available through the Studio Art Program, but loans are available on a first come basis. This course is designed to be open and accessible to all students. There may be an additional materials fee of $105.00

To purchase books and materials please visit: www.fairfield.edu/bookstore. Or visit our store in downtown Fairfield: 1499 Post Road, Fairfield, Conn. 06824.

Frequently Asked Questions

Program Questions

Q: What is the criteria for acceptance into the program?
A: Fairfield University is looking for engaged and curious rising junior and senior high school students to participate in the program. Qualified applicants must have earned a cumulative high school GPA of 3.2 to participate. Prior to the start of class, approximately five hours of pre-program reading or preparation is required (online).

Q: Can my daughter/son take more than one class?
A: Due to the rigorous nature of the two-week residential option, students will only be allowed to enroll in one class during that time. However, the entire summer course schedule, both in the classroom and online, is available to qualified students. 

Q: Is there financial aid or scholarships?
A: There is no financial aid or scholarships available for the Summer Scholars program.

Q: Who will enroll in these courses?
A: High school students will take these courses alongside current college students. Courses will be no larger than 20 students.

Q: Can this college credit be transferred to other schools?
A: In many cases, credits earned through Fairfield University will be accepted at other institutions. Fairfield University cannot guarantee that credits earned on our campus will be transferable to other Universities. Therefore, students and their families are encouraged to check with individual schools regarding the transferability of Fairfield University credits.

Residency Questions

Q: Are there other options beyond the Summer Scholars Residence Program for my high school student?
A: There is not a commuter option for the Summer Scholars Program. Students who apply to Summer Scholars must attend the full residence program. However, high school students can choose to take any summer course offered at Fairfield over the summer as a visiting student. Visit this page to learn more.

Q: Can my child come home over the weekend?
A: If your child takes part Summer Scholars, he/she must remain on campus for the entire program. If students must go home for emergency reasons, students are required to contact their Resident Assistant and fill out the proper paperwork.

Q: Who is available to help my child outside of the classroom?
A: Resident Assistants are college-aged students who will live with the Summer Scholars during the duration of the program. They will host social programs for the residential students on a nightly basis. They will also accompany students on all field trips off campus. They are also available 24 hours a day if a question or concern arises.

Q: Where will my child eat?
A: Summer Scholars will eat most meals in the Barone campus Center Main dining room. Some meals will be served within their residential hall or at an off-campus location.

Q: What are campus amenities that my child can enjoy while on campus?
A:Summer Scholars will have access to the entire campus during their program. This includes but is not limited to the University Fields, library, dining facility and snack bar.

Q: What should my child pack?
A: Please refer to our "what to bring" check list.

Q: Is there security on campus?
A: Yes. Our Department of Public Safety is staffed with 27 full-time members who patrol campus on bike, foot, and vehicle 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Q: What is a typical day like?
A: Please view last year's schedule. Closer to arrival, participants will receive a finalized schedule.

Q: Can students bring their cars?
A: Residential students are not permitted to bring cars to campus. Fairfield University will provide transportation for off-campus activities.

Other

Q: Who can I contact for more information?
A: Contact Fairfield University's College of Arts and Sciences at (203) 254-4000, ext. 2911 and make sure to reference the Summer Scholars program. Or e-mail summerscholars@fairfield.edu.

Meet our Faculty

Residence Life Experience

A college experience is not complete without a residential component.

Throughout the program, students will live in double rooms, share a common bathroom, and have access to lounges on every floor. Resident Assistants will provide educational and social programming to enhance the students' experience outside of the classroom. There is 24-hour support provided by live-in staff, Resident Assistants and Public Safety.

Students can take advantage of the many amenities offered on Fairfield University's beautiful 200-acre campus, which includes the state-of-the-art library, computer and science labs. The Dining hall and The Stag Snack Bar in the Campus Center offer a wide variety of menus and offerings.

‌The Office of Residence Life will schedule a variety of entertaining and fun events for students to enjoy, including: ‌

  • Field trips off campus to local beaches and the city
  • Karaoke socials
  • Dodge ball tournaments
  • Movie nights
  • Video game contests
  • Check out a slideshow of our beautiful campus

Enrichment Beyond the Classroom

Students will engage in a series of co-curricular activities:

  • "How to be academically successful in college" workshop
  • One-on-one academic advising
  • Library presentations
  • College search and application workshops

Schedule of Events and Activities

Below is the 2018 Summer Scholars schedule for reference:

 

Sunday, July 8
Location
4-6 p.m. Move In Kostka Hall
6 p.m. Welcome with Parents Barone Campus Center
6 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
7:30 p.m. Dessert Social and Floor Meeting Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Monday, July 9
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. StagCards and Bookstore Barone Campus Center
3 p.m. Campus Tours Kelly Center
5:30 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
8 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Tuesday, July 10
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. Free Time/Open Study Kostka Hall/Library
3:00 p.m. Study Skills Workshop Canisius Hall
5:30 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
 8 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Wednesday, July 11
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. "My First Year" Student Panel Canisius Hall
5:30 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
8 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Thursday, July 12
Location
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. College Admissions Workshop/Financial Aid Workshop Canisius Hall
5:30 p.m. Dinner  Tully Dining Hall
8 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Friday, July 13
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
2 p.m. Mall Trip and Dinner Connecticut Post Mall, Milford
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Saturday, July 14
11:30 a.m. Brunch Tully Dining Hall
12:30 p.m. Adventure Park Discovery Museum
5:30 p.m. Dinner Kostka Hall
8 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Sunday, July 15
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass (optional) Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius of Loyola
11:30 a.m. Brunch Tully Dining Hall
12 noon Free Time/Open Study Kostka Hall/Library
5:30 p.m. Dinner Kostka Hall
6:30 p.m. Academic Prep/Study Hall Library
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Monday, July 16
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. Workshop Canisius Hall
5:30 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
 8 p.m. RA Social  Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Tuesday, July 17
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. Time Management Workshop Canisius Hall
3 p.m. Art Exhibit Quick Center for the Arts
5:30 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
8 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Wednesday, July 18
Location
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. Stress Management Workshop Canisius Hall
3 p.m. Free Time/Open Study Kostka Hall/Library
5:30 p.m. Dinner Tully Dining Hall
7:30 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Thursday, July 19
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Lunch Tully Dining Hall
1:30 p.m. Meeting with Academic Advisor Canisius Hall
 3 p.m. Free Time/Open Study Kostka Hall/Library
5:30 p.m. Dinner  Tully Dining Hall
8:00 p.m. RA Social Program Kostka Hall
10:30 p.m. Building Curfew Kostka Hall
 
Friday, July 20
8:30 a.m. Breakfast Tully Dining Hall
9:30-12:30 p.m. Class Various Academic Buildings
12:30 p.m. Farewell Luncheon Tully Dining Hall
4 p.m. Check-Out Kostka Hall

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