Course Descriptions

Summer 2019 Course Offerings, Descriptions and Details will be posted in mid-February 2019. Registration begins on April 1, 2019.

Summer 2018 courses are listed below for your reference.

 

Accounting Courses

Intermediate Accounting I

AC 203
5/21/18 - 6/27/18 Mon./Wed., 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. plus 5/31/18 Thurs., 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
This course provides an in-depth study of financial accounting theory and concepts, and the presentation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The course emphasizes balance sheet valuations and their relationship to income measurement and determination. Prerequisite: AC 11. Three credits.

Intermediate Accounting II

AC 204
7/9/18 - 8/13/18, Mon./Wed., 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
This course continues the in-depth study of financial accounting theory and concepts, and the presentation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) begun in AC 203. In addition to balance sheet valuation and income measurement issues, the course includes special topics such as earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, leases, and cash flows. Prerequisite: AC 203. Three credits.

Anthropology Courses

Biological Anthropology

AY 110
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
The study of natural selection, primate evolution, and living primate societies provides a baseline from which to study the evolution of the human species. The course also traces human cultural and social development from the foraging bands of the first humans to the civilizations that appeared at the dawn of written history. Students also examine physical variation among living populations. This course meets the core science requirement and NOT the social science requirement. Three credits.

Cultural Anthropology

AY 111
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
Meets the world diversity requirement
Why is there such variety in the way people live, dress, speak, eat, love and fight? This course explores the shared patterns of thought, behavior, and feelings - that is, the cultures - of a number of peoples and presents explanations for the forms they take and the differences between them. The course helps students develop a new perspective on the values and institutions of Western culture. Three credits.

Applied Ethics Courses

Business Ethics

AE 291
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course investigates ethical problems in business practice. Topics include the foundation of the free-market system, personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; codes of ethics, obligations to employees and other stakeholders; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing, and company loyalty; self and government regulation; the logic and future of capitalism; and the changing responsibilities of the manager in a rapidly globalizing business environment. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies. Three credits.

Ethics of War and Peace

AE 293
7/9/18 - 8/2/18, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. to 9:55 p.m.
This is a survey of issues relating to war and international conflict. Topics include Just War theory, human rights issues, the impact of war on women, the role of the United Nations Security Council, and the history of global attempts to proscribe and prevent aggression. The course also looks at related issues that have emerged in recent years, such as humanitarian intervention and economic sanctions. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.Three credits.

Ethics in Law and Society

AE 295
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course is an inquiry into the ethical dilemmas of making, enforcing, adjudicating, obeying and practicing the law. Topics include the nature of law and the province of jurisprudence, responsibility of the criminal bar (defense, prosecution, judicial), conflicts of interest, election or appointment of judges, the moral infrastructure of the Constitution, the limits of adjudication, and issues relating to investigative technique (torture and extreme confinement conditions). Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies. Three credits.

Art History Courses

Visual Culture Since 1400: Expression and Experimentation

AH 11
7/9/18 to 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course explores the ways in which people use images to record their world. From the development of linear perspective in the early Renaissance to the assimilation of advances in optical sciences in the baroque period and the incorporation of photography in the 19th century, art has responded to technological advances and created distinct and expressive visual cultures. By exploring painting, sculpture, the graphic arts, and architecture, students learn to analyze how the contemporary world is designed and defined by a visual heritage that incorporates historical images into film, television, and advertising. Three credits.

Art of Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas

AH 13
Meets the world diversity requirement
6/4/18 to 6/28/18, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. to 9:55 p.m.
This course is an introduction to art and architecture of Africa, the Caribbean islands, and Central America, South America and North America. Major works of art and architecture will be examined to understand the respective cultures and traditions of these regions. Cultures designated by their geographical locations will provide a frame of study for African visual culture. Art of Caribbean islands and the influence of the African diaspora will be explored. The Americas will be represented by Pre-Columbian and Native American visual arts. Students will be introduced to different art historical approaches and vocabulary used to study art from each of these areas. Three credits.

Inside Museums & Galleries: Faces/Places/Public Spaces

AH 193
5/23/18 to 5/30/18 (no class on 5/28), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This course explores the interactive role of the curator and the museum and gallery visitor in the dynamic cultural spaces of museums, galleries, and public historic spaces, parks, monuments, etc. We explore the responsibilities, ethics, and educational goals for the professional staff of not-for-profit museums in terms of serving the common good of the general public. If museums are “temples of culture,” then we need to understand the ways these public “faiths” act while open and engaging for all. In contrast, we highlight the similarities and differences when artworks or collectible objects are placed into a commercialized, for profit-gallery/auction house context. This is an introductory course, welcoming students ready to experience and learn about the rich spectrum of museums, galleries, auction houses, and cultural institutions within the Tri-State area. Field trips include visits with top professionals who share their expertise and experiences. No prerequisites. Three credits.

 

Biology Courses

Science, Technology, and Society

BI 70
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course analyzes the major science and technology issues that confront today's society. Through an examination of the underlying science, students gain an understanding of the impact these issues hold for the environment, our natural resources, and our society, including benefit versus hazard expectations. Course issues, which change to incorporate timely topics, include acid rain; agriculture; diseases such as AIDS, cancer, and heart disease; energy; genetic engineering; the greenhouse effect; ozone depletion; and water pollution. Note: This course counts as a science coure course but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor. Three credits.

Identity and the Human Genome

BI 71 - 2 sections:
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE

7/9/18 - 7/20/18, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course introduces human genetics to the non-science major. Topics of discussion include the structure and function of genes, modes of inheritance, stem cell research, sex and gender and human genetic diversity. Special emphasis is placed on ethical, legal and social issues related to the knowledge and application of genetic information. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor. Three credits.

Introduction to Marine Science

BI 78
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course introduces the non-science major and the marine science minor to the field of oceanography. Topics dealing with the geological, physical, chemical, and biological aspects of science underscore the interdisciplinary nature of world ocean study. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor. Three credits.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

BI 107 lecture: 6/4/18 - 7/6/18, Mon./Wed./Fri., 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. (4 credits) (Corequisite: BI 107L)
BI 107L lab: 6/5/18 - 7/5/18, Tues./Thurs., 8 a.m. to 10:50 a.m. (0 credits)
This course is required for nursing majors as a prerequisite for most nursing courses. A strong chemistry background is recommended. Homeostasis is the major theme of the course with form and function covered together each semester. This course introduces the student to anatomical terminology, homeostasis and feedback control, membrane physiology, and tissues followed by the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Note: This course is not open to biology majors except where required for allied health sciences (chair approval required).

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

BI 108 lecture: 7/9/18 - 8/10/18, Mon./Wed./Fri., 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. (4 credits) (Corequisite: BI 108L)
BI 108L lab: 7/10/18 to 8/9/18 Tues./Thurs., 8 a.m. to 10:50 a.m. (0 credits)
This course is required for nursing majors as a prerequisite for most nursing courses. A strong chemistry background is recommended. Homeostasis is the major theme of the course with form and function covered together each semester. This course continues with the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems. Laboratory work closely follows the lecture and includes microscopic anatomy (histology), use of anatomical models, human skeletons and dissections for study of gross anatomy, and physiology experiments including muscle recruitment measurements, cranial nerve tests, blood pressure measurements, blood typing, etc. Note: This course is not open to biology majors except where required for allied health sciences (chair approval required). Prerequisite: BI 107.

General Biology I

BI 170 lecture: 6/4/18 - 7/6/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon (4 credits) (Corequisites: BI 170L; BI 170P)
BI 170L lab: 6/4/18 - 7/2/18, Mon./Wed., 1 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. plus class on Thurs., 7/5 from 1 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. (0 credits)
This introductory course for biology majors covers the molecular and cellular basis of life, including cell structure and function, cell communication, inheritance, gene expression and regulation, and developmental genetics. Students receive hands-on experience with a broad range of topics and techniques in the accompanying laboratory.

Business Courses

Legal Environment of Business

BU 211
5/23/18 - 5/30/18 (no class on Mon., 5/28), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This course examines the broad philosophical as well as practical nature and function of the legal system, and introduces students to the legal and social responsibilities of business. The course includes an introduction to the legal system, the federal courts, Constitutional law, the United States Supreme Court, the civil process, and regulatory areas such as employment discrimination, protection of the environment, and corporate governance and securities markets. Three credits.

Chemistry Courses

Introduction to Forensic Science

CH 007
7/9/18 - 7/20/18,  Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course provides an introduction to the scientific techniques used for the analysis of common types of physical evidence encountered at crime scenes. Using critical thinking and laboratory experiences, students become crime scene investigators. They are charged with the task of solving a mock crime. The investigations include fabric analysis, ink analysis, blood analysis, DNA analysis, fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and/or blood alcohol analysis. The lecture part of the course focuses on exploring the underlying chemical principles behind the techniques and includes discussion of historical case studies. Note: This course counts as a science core course but does not satisfy requirements for the chemistry major or minor. Three credits.

General Chemistry I Lecture and Lab

CH 111 lecture: 6/4/18 - 7/6/18, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, covers atomic and molecular weights, the mole concept, Avogadro's number, stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the electronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the elements, chemical bonding, geometrics of molecules, molecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and nonmetals, and chemistry of coordination compounds. Corequisite: CH 111L. Three credits.

CH 111L lab: 6/5/18 - 7/5/18, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and record observations on simple chemical systems while learning fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement skills. Experiments demonstrate and supplement concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester emphasizes weighing, filtering, titrating, using volumetric glassware, observing data, and recording and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates these techniques in experimental procedures and explores physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemical systems. Corequisite: CH 111. One credit.

General Chemistry II Lecture and Lab

CH 112 lecture: 7/9/18 - 8/10/18, Mon-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course, the second in a two-semester sequence, covers atomic and molecular weights, the mole concept, Avogadro's number, stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the electronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the elements, chemical bonding, geometrics of molecules, molecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and nonmetals, and chemistry of coordination compounds. Corequisite: CH 112L; Prerequisite: CH 111. Three credits.

CH 112L lab: 7/10/18 - 8/9/18, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and record observations on simple chemical systems while learning fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement skills. Experiments demonstrate and supplement concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester emphasizes weighing, filtering, titrating, using volumetric glassware, observing data, and recording and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates these techniques in experimental procedures and explores physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemical systems. Corequisite: CH 112. One credit.

Organic Chemistry I Lecture and Lab

CH 211 lecture: 6/4/18 - 7/6/18, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course, an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds, discusses common functional groups from the perspective of molecular structure. Areas of emphasis include structure and characterization, preparation or organic synthesis, and the relations of physical and chemical properties to molecular structure. Stereochemical concepts introduced early in the course are used throughout. Prerequisite: CH 112; Corequisite: CH 211L. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for CH 211 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

CH 211L lab: 6/5/18 to 7/5/17, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This lab emphasizes the manipulative techniques of separation, purification, analysis, and simple syntheses. Corequisite: CH 211. One credit.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for CH 211L from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Organic Chemistry II Lecture and Lab

CH 212 lecture: 7/9/18 to 8/10/18, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course is a continuation of CH 211 and presents the chemistry of aromatic, carbonyl, acyl, and nitrogen compounds. The course relates the chemical properties of naturally occurring substances such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids to those of simpler monofunctional compounds. Spectroscopic methods of structure determination are introduced early in the course and used throughout. Prerequisite: CH 211; Corequisite: CH 212 Lab. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for CH 212 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

CH 212L lab: 7/10/18 to 8/9/18, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m to 4:30 p.m.
This lab emphasizes investigative experiments, more complex synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis. Corequisite: CH 212. One credit.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for CH 212L from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Communication Courses

Human Communication Theories

CO 100
5/29/18  - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course introduces major theoretical perspectives that inform communication scholarship. This foundational course for the major emphasizes understanding human communication as a symbolic process that creates, maintains, and alters personal, social, and cultural identities. Students critique research literature in the communication field in this course, which is a prerequisite for the 200- and 300-level communication courses. This course counts in the social and behavioral sciences core curriculum for non-majors. Three credits.

Argument and Advocacy

CO 101
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This introduction to public speaking and the advocacy process includes topic identification; methods of organization, research, selection, and arrangement of support materials; audience analysis and adaptation; patterns and fallacies of reasoning; uses of evidence; logical proof; and refutation. Students practice and critique informative and persuasive presentations in this course, which is a skill required in all 200- and 300-level communication courses. Three credits.

Intercultural Communication

CO 240
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
Meets the U.S. diversity requirement
This course deals with challenges to communication between people of different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing the ways communication practices reveal cultural values and the role of communication in creating and sustaining cultural identities. Students discuss how differences in value orientation, perception, thought patterns, and nonverbal behavior cause misunderstanding, tension, and conflict in business, education, and healthcare settings. Registration preference given to Communication and International Studies majors.  Prerequisite: CO 100 or CO 102 or IL 50. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for CO 240 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Internship: Summer 2018 semester

CO 399
Contact Dr. Qin Zhang for details at qzhang@fairfield.edu
Communication internships provide students with first-hand knowledge about the field of work, allow them to experience new professional activities and relationships, help them apply conceptual knowledge and skills in communication in the work environment, and allow them to experience the problems and successes of efficiently and effectively communicating within a complex organization. One three-credit internship course can be used toward the major. Students may take an internship twice for credit. Prerequisites: 2.8 overall GPA and junior or senior status. One to three credits per semester; six-credit limit. 

Economics

Introduction to Microeconomics

EC 11
Three sessions:
5/29/18 - 7/6/18 ONLINE
7/9/18 - 7/20/18, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
7/9/18 - 8/2/18, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. - 9:55 p.m.
This course analyzes the behavior of individual consumers and producers as they deal with the economic problem of allocating scarce resources. The course examines how markets function to establish prices and quantities through supply and demand, how resource costs influence firm supply, and how variations in competition levels affect economic efficiency. Topics may include antitrust policy, the distribution of income, the role of government, and environmental problems. The course includes computer applications. Three credits.

Introduction to Macroeconomics

EC 12
7/9/18 - 8/17/18 ONLINE
This course develops models of the aggregate economy to determine the level of output, income, prices, and unemployment in an economy. In recognition of the growing importance of global economic activity, these models incorporate the international sector. The course examines and evaluates the role of public economic policy, including fiscal and monetary policy. Topics may include growth theory and price stability. The course includes computer applications. Three credits.

 

English

Texts and Contexts I: Writing as Craft and Inquiry

EN  11
7/9/18 - 8/3/18, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course introduces students to the many kinds of reading and writing they will do across the curriculum and beyond. Students learn to draft, revise, and edit their own texts and respond effectively to the texts of their peers. The course offers practice with writing and reading assignments that call on different contexts (purposes, audiences, forms, or modes). Through the careful use of primary and secondary sources, students will foster their academic curiosities, practice reflection, and read deeply to join the conversation of ideas. Three credits.

Texts and Contexts II: Writing About Literature

EN 12
Two sections:
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE (This section only meets the U.S. diversity requirement - Professor: Gale Bellas)
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course builds on the reading, writing, and critical inquiry work of EN 11, focusing on the development of increasingly sophisticated reading, writing, researching and inquiry skills through the exploration of literary texts and their contexts. Students will practice close reading techniques, be introduced to key terms and concepts in literary study, and practice writing in a variety of academic and creative genres. The course is intended to foster greater appreciation for the power of literature and literary study as a foundation to all the liberal arts. Prerequisite: EN 11. Three credits.

Introduction to Contemporary World Literature

EN 102
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
Meets the world diversity requirement
Students will review recent fiction from around the world, including Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, New Zealand, and the Middle East. Students learn strategies for comparing stories and narrative styles from different cultures, subject positions, and sociopolitical frameworks. Students develop a stronger awareness of different types of subjectivity in a global context. The course is suitable for non-majors seeking to fulfill the world diversity and English core requirements, and for English majors who have not yet taken more than one course beyond EN 11 and EN 12. Prequisites: EN 11, EN 12. Three credits.

Imagining Shakespeare

EN 141
Two sessions:
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
Shakespeare is considered the greatest writer in the English language. This course will investigate how his genius is expressed in comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. We will study how each kind of play influences the others in every part of Shakespeare's career. Plays include The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Henry IV, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. We will take a multimedia approach by analyzing performances as well as text. The history of Shakespeare's era and of his critics will be studied as well. Prerequisites: EN 11, EN 12. Three credits.

Irish Literature

EN 161
7/9/18 - 8/3/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
The course studies the deep connections between the literature and history of Ireland from 1800 to the present. Building on EN 11 and 12, it further develops the ability to read literature closely (to analyze and interpret the figurative language and stylistic features of fiction, drama, and poetry) and to write convincingly about the meanings and ideas that such close reading yields. It also adds to this skill by teaching students to recognize and articulate the inherent links between literature, history, and culture - links which are particularly evident in modern Irish writing, and which are revealed through close reading. Prerequisites: EN 11, EN 12. Three credits.

Literature of Illness and Healing: Wounded Storytellers and Dedicated Healers

EN 163
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
Meets the U.S. diversity requirement
What is it like to suffer a stroke, contend with cancer, deal with depression or live with a crippling disease? While biomedicine may clinically treat such conditions, it is to literature that we turn to gain a humanistic understanding of the emotional and spiritual impact of illness on wounded storytellers and on the dedicated doctors and nurses who care for them. Readings in various literary genres- memoir, essay, poetry, fiction, drama- and films with medical themes will also explore issues of diversity, noting how gender, race, ethnicity, religion and sexual orientation affect the illness experience. Prerequisites: EN11, EN 12. Three credits.

Creative Writing

EN/W 200
7/9/18 - 7/20/18, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
This course will develop creativity and critical thinking through various writing exercises in the composition of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, digital writing, and hybrid forms. Students will complete both informal and formal assignments, utilize directives for process writing, and keep daily journals. This course will present information on the context of each genre's important histories, authors, and communities, and information on editing and publishing. Students will participate in a writing workshop and complete a final portfolio of three complete works. Prerequisite: EN 12. Three credits. Please e-mail Professor Marciano with questions: lmarciano@fairfield.edu

English Writing Internship

EN/W 346
Students undertake individual tutorials in writing and can obtain credit for writing for The Mirror, The Sound, or for other projects of personal interest. Only one independent writing project can be counted toward fulfilling the five field electives required to complete an English major. The department will consider exceptions only if multiple Independent Writing Project courses cover different subject areas and approval in advance is obtained. Enrollment by permission only. Contact Dr. Emily Orlando for more information at eorlando@fairfield.edu

Finance

Introduction to Finance

FI 101
7/9/18 -  8/17/18 ONLINE
This course provides the building blocks for understanding the role of finance in the domestic and international environments. Specifically, in a qualitative and quantitative manner, this course addresses the three interrelated fields of finance, namely: financial markets, investments, and business finance. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, AC 11, EC 11, EC 12, one math course. Three credits.

 

History

Origins of the Modern World Since 1500

HI 10
6/4/18 - 6/29/18, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
The course, which examines the history of Europe and its relationship to the world from the end of the Middle Ages through the 19th century, emphasizes the cultural, social, economic, and political forces and structures that led to the development of commercial and industrial capitalism, and the effects of this development on Europe, the New World, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation; the Transatlantic Slave Trade; European expansion and colonialism; the development of strong nation states; the Enlightenment; the Industrial Revolution and conflicting ideological and political responses; changing social, family, and gender relationships; and the increasing interaction of Europeans and non-Europeans. Critical analysis of primary and secondary sources develops skills in historical methodology that are of great value in many other academic pursuits. Written assignments and class discussions enhance these skills. Three credits.

Twentieth Century United States

HI 239
6/4/18 - 6/29/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Meets the U.S. diversity requirement
The course surveys developments in American social, political, and economic life since 1900. Major themes include problems of advanced industrial society, the growing government role in the economy, America's growing role in the world, and social movements of the 1930s and 1960s. Ethnic and cultural diversity within American society receive attention. Prerequisite: HI 10 or CL 115 or CL 116. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for HI 239 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Information Studies

Introduction to Information Systems

IS 100
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course helps students understand the role of Information Systems in the contemporary business environment. It introduces them to the use of information systems concepts and techniques in solving a wide range of business problems. Working in small teams, students develop, analyze, and present solutions to a business problem using information technology. Three credits.

Management

Performance, Compensation, and Reward

MG 380
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course covers theories and practices for effective compensation management. Topics include strategic perspectives of compensation systems, determining pay structure, job analysis, and job evaluation, design and administration, external pay competitiveness, designing pay levels, employee contributions and individual pay, subjective performance evaluation and merit pay, alternative reward systems, employee benefits, government's role and compliance, pay discrimination, budgets and pay administration, and union role in wages and salary administration. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Three credits.

Marketing

Principles of Marketing

MK 101
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course introduces the fundamental concepts and theories that drive day-to-day marketing decisions. A thorough understanding of the marketplace (consumer or business-to-business) is at the heart of such decision making. In this course, students will learn to identify and satisfy customer’s wants and needs. The core tools that enable managers to move from decision-making to action are addressed, namely: product development, pricing, channel management and structure, and promotions (including advertising and sales). Additional topics include global marketing, societal and marketing ethics, and digital marketing. Students are required to work in a team to construct a marketplace analysis for a chosen product/service. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Three credits.

Digital Marketing

MK 241
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
From social networks to mobile applications, marketing in the digital age is markedly different than in the past. The course identifies marketing strategies that work in this new environment. Students will study how e-business and digital marketing continue to alter the business landscape and how certain theoretical frameworks can help to explain some of the current issues in the field. Specifically, students will examine how digital marketing has affected product, pricing, distribution, research, communication, and public policies. Prequisites: MK 101; junior or senior standing. Three credits.

Mathematics

Concepts of Calculus

MA 16
6/4/18 - 6/29/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course introduces differentiation and integration, and shows how these ideas are related. The course illustrates how important and interesting applied questions, when expressed in the language of mathematical functions, turn out to be questions about derivatives and integrals and, thus, can be solved using calculus. The basic concepts of calculus are numerically, algebraically, and geometrically investigated, using graphing technology to illustrate many of the underlying geometrical ideas. This is a terminal core course and is not a prerequisite for any other course. Please note that MA 11 is not an appropriate course to take before taking MA 16.

Introduction to Probability and Statistics

MA 17
6/4/18 - 6/29/18 Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This introduction to the theory of statistics includes measures of central tendency, variance, Chebyshev's theorem, probability theory, binomial distribution, normal distribution, the central limit theorem, and estimating population means for large samples. Students who have received credit for any mathematics course at the 100-level or higher may not take this course for credit without the permission of the department chair. Three credits.

Applied Calculus I

MA 119
6/4/18 - 6/29/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Topics in this course include: foundations of the calculus; differentiation of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; extrema and curve sketching; applications of derivatives; antiderivatives; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and integration of algebraic functions.  A graphing calculator and Wolfram Alpha are among the technologies that may be used. Students who received credit for MA 19, MA 145 or MA 171 may not take MA 119 for credit. Prerequisite: Precalculus. Three credits. 

Applied Calculus II

MA 120
7/9/18 - 8/3/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Topics in this course include: applications of the derivative, including implicit differentiation, related rates and linear approximation; integration of algebraic, transcendental and trigonometric functions; differentiation of trigonometric functions; techniques of integration; applications of the definite integral; infinite series.  A graphing calculator and Wolfram Alpha are among the technologies that may be used. Students who receive credit for MA 146 or MA 172 may not receive credit for MA 120. Prerequisite: MA 119. Three credits.

Accelerated Statistics

MA 217
Two sessions: Both will run from 5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This introductory, calculus-based statistics course focuses on applications in business, statistics, and everyday events. Topics include descriptive statistics including mean, median, mode, standard deviation, histograms, distributions, box plots, and scatter plots; probability theory including counting rules, random variables, probability distributions, expected values, binomial and normal distributions, and the central limit theorem; inferential statistics including point estimates, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing; and regression theory. Students learn to analyze data with the aid of common software packages. Mathematics majors may not take this course as a mathematics elective. Students who have received credit for MA 352 may not take MA 217 for credit. Prerequisites: MA 119 or MA 145 or MA 171. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for MA 217 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

 

 

Music

The History and Development of Rock

MU 102
5/23/18 - 5/30/18 (no class on Monday, 5/28) Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
This course surveys the musical and social trends that resulted in the emergence of rock and roll as an important musical and cultural force in America. The course traces the roots of rock, blues, and country styles, showing how they merged with popular music. Students examine periods from the 1950s to the present, along with Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, the Beatles, the British invasion, folk music, Bob Dylan, jazz and art rock, Jimi Hendrix, the west coast movement, and the music industry. Students learn to understand, discuss, and differentiate between stylistic periods and their historical relevance to American culture. This course meets the U.S. diversity requirement. Three credits.

History of Music: 1700-1964

MU 104
7/9/18- 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course explores the ways in which composers manipulated musical language to meet the growing demands of the middle class. After learning the basic elements of music, students explore the world of the Enlightenment and Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. In the romantic period, the course explores the interaction of all the arts and the influence of politics and econom­ics on compositional style. With the dawn of the 20th century, the course explores what “modern” means, learns about attempts to expand and replace musical language, and studies the impact of American culture on music. Three credits

Hip-Hop and its Antecedents

MU 201
Meets the U.S. diversity requirement
Two sessions:
Both 5/29/18 to 7/7/18 ONLINE
This class explores the musical, cultural, political and aesthetic foundations of hip-hop. We will trace the corporeal, visual, spoken word, literary and musical antecedents to and manifestations of hip-hop in American cultural. Students will investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip-hop is created and assessed. We will analyze the effects of corporate America and examine the images and ideas presented by an industry driven by profit. Are we really in a post-racial society? How does hop-hop help us understand race, class, gender, power, and oppression? Artists studied will not be those with the highest number of albums sold, but those with significant musical or lyrical content and impact on hip-hop as a whole.

 

Nursing

Healthcare Delivery Systems

NS 112
5/21/18 – 8/17/18 ONLINE
The health care delivery system is explored from a historical, economic, political, and health information technology perspective. Emphasis is given to social, ethical, and legal aspects of the current system that remain unresolved, such as access to care, health disparities, and equity. The history and progression of healthcare reform and its influence on our current healthcare system performance will be analyzed. Global health issues and their impact on the delivery of health care services are discussed, along with consumer use of complementary and alternative therapies. This course is designed to give an inter-professional perspective to students interested in health care from any field of study. 42 theory hours.

Operations Management

Operations Management

OM 101
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course provides the primary exposure to service and manufacturing operations management within the business core curriculum. Topics include process modeling, quality management and control, decision analysis, capacity planning, supply chain management, and project planning and control. Special attention is given to showing how concepts and models presented in lectures and readings apply to real-world business situations. Examples of international operations are studied, and ethical issues are explored within the context of decisions such as where to locate facilities. Prerequisites: EC 278 or MA 17 or MA 217; sophomore standing. Three credits.

Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

PH 101
6/4/18 - 6/29/18 Mon.-Fri., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
This course is a topical introduction to philosophy. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the vocation of wonder and questioning by engaging students in discussions about some of the basic questions of philosophy.  Students will read texts from historical and contemporary writers, and will be asked to develop their own skills of thinking, reading, and writing critically.  Three Credits. 

Philosophy of Science

PH 215
7/9/18 - 8/3/18 Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Science and philosophy have always proceeded hand in hand, with the major figures in Western science being heavily influenced by the philosophy of their times and the major figures in Western philosophy heavily influenced by the science of their times. In this course we will explore the interconnections between philosophy and science. In doing so we will find some of the most deep, difficult, and fundamental questions there are, but with the "lens of science," so to speak, focusing these questions more sharply than they are often otherwise focused. Prerequisite: PH 101. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for PH 215 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Logic

PH 217
6/4/18 - 6/29/18 Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
This course provides a basic acquaintance with prevailing systems and methods of logic, notably traditional (Aristotelian) and modern (standard mathematical) logics. Prerequisite: PH 101. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for PH 217 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Physics

Nature of the Universe

PS 78
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
This course, intended for non-science majors, reviews the scientific field of cosmology, or the nature of the physical universe, from a historical perspective. Beginning with the ancients, the course traces the development of cosmological principles through the Greek and Egyptian era of Aristotle, C. Ptolemy, and others; the 16th and 17th centuries of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton; and the cosmology of the 20th century based upon Einstein's theories of relativity coupled with several fundamental observations. This leads to an examination of the current model of the universe, which is based upon the Big Bang theory. Three credits.

General Physics I

PS 115
6/4/18 - 6/29/18 Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This introductory course - for students concentrating in physics, mathematics, chemistry, or engineering - covers mechanics, heat, and fluid dynamics. It also includes rigorous mathematical derivations using integral and differential calculus. Topics include velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, power momentum, torque, vibratory motion, elastic properties of solids, fluids at rest and in motion, properties of gases, measurement and transfer of heat, and elementary thermodynamics. Corequisite MA 145 or equivalent (or higher). Prerequisite: MA 145 or hight (concurrency allowed). Three credits.

Lab for General Physics I

PS 115L
6/4/18 - 6/29/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This lab course engages students in experimental measurements spanning the areas of mechanics and thermal stresses on matter, with the objective of training students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation, providing depth to students' understanding of the phenomena taught in PS 15. Specific experimental measurements include accelerated motion, periodic motion, gravitational force, ballistics, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational dynamics, and measurements of the coefficient of linear expansion and the heat of fusion. Students complete a weekly lab report. Corequisite PS 15. One credit.

General Physics II

PS 116
7/9/18 to 8/3/18, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This continuation of PS 15 covers electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and sound. Topics include magnetism and electricity; simple electric circuits; electrical instruments; generators and motors; characteristics of wave motion; light and illumination; reflection; refraction, interference; polarization of light, color, and the spectrum; and production and detection of sound waves. Prerequisites: MA 146 or higher (concurrency  allowed); PS 115. Three credits. 

General Physics II Lab

PS 116L
7/9/18 - 8/3/18, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This laboratory provides students with a greater understanding of electromagnetic phenomena, wave phenomena, and optics, and supports PS 16. Measurements of microscopic quantities, like the charge and mass of the electron, give students an opportunity to explore the structure of matter. Other experiments involve the physics of electrical currents, electric properties of bulk matter, magnetic fields and their effect on beams, wave phenomena, and the nature of light and its interaction with optical materials. This course trains students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation. Students complete a weekly lab report. Corequisite: PS 116. One credit.

Politics

United States Foreign Policy

PO 133
7/9/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course examines the impact of domestic and international actors and processes in the formation and conduct of United States foreign policy. It provides a historical background on the basis of which it analyzes contemporary United States economic and security (broadly understood) foreign policy in different regions of the world, including Asia, Europe and the Middle East.  Three credits.

Psychology

General Psychology

PY 101
Two sessions:
5/29/18 - 7/14/18 ONLINE
7/9/18  to 7/20/18, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course introduces the science of mental processes and behavior by addressing a range of questions including: How is brain activity related to thought and behavior? What does it mean to learn and remember something? How do we see, hear, taste, and smell? How do we influence one another's attitudes and actions? What are the primary factors that shape a child's mental and emotional development? How and why do we differ from one another? What are the origins and most effective treatments of mental illness? Three credits.

Developmental Psychology for Non-Majors

PY 111
5/29/18 - 7/14/18 ONLINE
This section meets the U.S. diversity requirement.
The course encompasses a developmental psychology approach to the growth of the individual from birth to old age, tracing motor, perceptual, language, cognitive, and emotional growth and emphasizing normal devel­opment. Psychology majors and students who have taken PY 211 or PY 212 may not take this course. Psychology majors are required to take PY 211 or 212. Three credits.

Abnormal Psychology for Non-Majors

PY 131
7/2/18 - 8/18/18 ONLINE
This course introduces students to the field of abnormal behavior, presenting the classic behavior patterns in the classification system and discussing the possible causes and remediation of such. Psychology majors and students who have taken PY 231 may not take this course. Three credits.


 

 

Religious Studies

Exploring Religion: Peoples of the Book, Sacred Texts and their Communities

RS 101E
Three Sessions:
Two sessions from  5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
One session from 7/9/18 - 8/3/18 Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
This course invites students to explore the religious dimensions of human experience, emphasizing the themes of scripture, community and practice. In a critical appraisal of one or more of the great religious traditions of the world, students will analyze sacred texts in context, discover how social patterns shape religious communities, and survey a wide variety of religious devotions and practices, both personal and communal. Students in this course will learn to investigate the religious lives, beliefs, experiences and values of others, in their scope and diversity, respecting both the differences from, and the similarities to, their own. This subsection of RS 101 examines the relationship between sacred text and the historical communities of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Focusing on shared narratives, such as Adam and Eve in the Garden, the course illustrates the different ways that texts are interpreted and the various roles that Scripture plays in these communities. Three credits.

Good News of the Gospels

RS 221
6/4/18 - 6/29/18, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course examines the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John according to contemporary exegetical and literary methodologies. The course examines and compares the theological positions of early Christianity as represented by each writer and by other early Christian gospels. Prerequisite: RS 101. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for RS 221 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Contemporary Moral Problems

RS 252
Two sessions:
5/29/18 - 7/7/18   ONLINE
7/9/18 to 8/18/18 ONLINE
This theological examination of contemporary moral problems considers selected ethical issues in contemporary society and leading approaches to moral decision-making. The course investigates moral problems such as euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, the death penalty, violence and just war theory, bioethics, sexual and reproductive ethics, global poverty, environmental ethics, and issues in business and legal ethics.  Prerequisite: RS 101. Three credits.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please contact Sandy Richardson at arichardson@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for RS 252 from the Fairfield University College of Arts & Sciences Dean's Office.

Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

SO 11
6/4/18 - 6/28/18, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. to 9:55 p.m.
This introduction to sociology provides students with a sense of sociology's orientation; its particular way of looking at human behavior in the context of people's interaction with each other. The course emphasizes the kinds of questions sociology asks, the methods it uses to search for answers, and how it applies the answers to problems of people's everyday lives and issues of social policy. Three credits.

Criminal Justice System Seminar

SO 279
5/23/18 - 5/30/18 (no class on 5/28), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This seminar explores in detail the workings and problems of the criminal justice system in the United States. In addition to investigating the sources of criminal behavior, the course focuses on the arraignment process, probation, the trial, sentencing, prison reform, and parole. Three credits.

Spanish

Elementary Spanish I

SP 110
6/4/18 - 6/29/18 Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Designed for students with no prior experience with Spanish or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Three credits.

Studio Art

Introduction to Digital Tools in Art Making

SA 101
5/29/18 - 7/7/18 ONLINE
In this introductory studio course, students will explore digital graphics software and how it may be used in conjunction with traditional art media (such as painting and drawing in pencil, ink, charcoal, pastels, and gouache) to develop a unique visual voice. Through projects that build on one another's idea-based and technical components, students will develop an understanding of vocabulary fundamental to visual language and technology's relationship to art now and throughout history. Projects will emphasize that digital technology is not an end in itself, but a means to realizing ideas. Three credits.

Alternative Processes Photography

SA 133
7/9/18 - 7/20/18, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course covers alternative techniques in photography, including Cyanotypes, Kallitypes, collage, and instant photography. Additionally, students will have readings pertaining to the history of the medium, and will be introduced to contemporary concepts and use of the photographic image. A digital camera, while not required, will be useful. There are a small number of manual and digital loaner cameras available through the Studio Art Program, but loans are available on a first come basis. This course is designed to be open and accessible to all students. Three credits.

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