Course Descriptions

Summer 2018 Course Offerings, Descriptions and Details will be posted in mid-February 2018. The Summer 2017 Courses are listed below for your reference.

Accounting Courses

Intermediate Accounting I

AC 203
5/22/17 - 6/28/17 Mon./Wed., 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Also, Thurs., 6/1 from 6 to 9:30 p.m.
This course provides an in-depth study of financial accounting theory and concepts, and the presentation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The course emphasizes balance sheet valuations and their relationship to income measurement and determination. (Prerequisite: AC 11) Three credits.

Intermediate Accounting II

AC 204
7/17/17 - 8/14/17, Mon./Wed., 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
This course continues the in-depth study of financial accounting theory and concepts, and the presentation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) begun in AC 203. In addition to balance sheet valuation and income measurement issues, the course includes special topics such as earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, leases, and cash flows. (Prerequisite: C or better in AC 203) Three credits.

Anthropology Courses

Biological Anthropology

AY 110
7/10/17 - 8/19/17 ONLINE
The study of natural selection, primate evolution, and living primate societies provides a baseline from which to study the evolution of the human species. The course also traces human cultural and social development from the foraging bands of the first humans to the civilizations that appeared at the dawn of written history. Students also examine physical variation among living populations. This course meets the core science requirement and NOT the social science requirement. Three credits.

Cultural Anthropology

AY 111
5/30/17 - 7/8/17 ONLINE
Why is there such variety in the way people live, dress, speak, eat, love and fight? This course explores the shared patterns of thought, behavior, and feelings - that is, the cultures - of a number of peoples and presents explanations for the forms they take and the differences between them. The course helps students develop a new perspective on the values and institutions of Western culture. This course meets the world diversity requirement. Three credits.

Applied Ethics Courses

Business Ethics

AE 291
7/10/17 - 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course investigates ethical problems in business practice. Topics include the foundation of the free-market system, personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; codes of ethics, obligations to employees and other stakeholders; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing, and company loyalty; self and government regulation; the logic and future of capitalism; and the changing responsibilities of the manager in a rapidly globalizing business environment. Three credits.

Ethics of War and Peace

AE 293
7/10/17 - 8/3/17, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. to 9:55 p.m.
This is a survey of issues relating to war and international conflict. Topics include Just War theory, human rights issues, the impact of war on women, the role of the United Nations Security Council, and the history of global attempts to proscribe and prevent aggression. The course also looks at related issues that have emerged in recent years, such as humanitarian intervention and economic sanctions. Three credits.

Ethics in Law and Society

AE 295
5/30/17 - 7/8/17 ONLINE
This course is an inquiry into the ethical dilemmas of making, enforcing, adjudicating, obeying and practicing the law. Topics include the nature of law and the province of jurisprudence, responsibility of the criminal bar (defense, prosecution, judicial), conflicts of interest, election or appointment of judges, the moral infrastructure of the Constitution, the limits of adjudication, and issues relating to investigative technique (torture and extreme confinement conditions). Three credits.

Art History Courses

Visual Culture Since 1400: Expression and Experimentation (H)

AH 11
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course explores the ways in which people use images to record their world. From the development of linear perspective in the early Renaissance to the assimilation of advances in optical sciences in the baroque period and the incorporation of photography in the 19th century, art has responded to technological advances and created distinct and expressive visual cultures. By exploring painting, sculpture, the graphic arts, and architecture, students learn to analyze how the contemporary world is designed and defined by a visual heritage that incorporates historical images into film, television, and advertising. One class takes place at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Three credits.

Art of Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas (H)

AH 13
6/5/17 to 6/29/17, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. to 9:55 p.m.
This course is an introduction to art and architecture of Africa, the Caribbean islands, and Central America, South America and North America. Major works of art and architecture will be examined to understand the respective cultures and traditions of these regions. Cultures designated by their geographical locations will provide a frame of study for African visual culture. Art of Caribbean islands and the influence of the African diaspora will be explored. The Americas will be represented by Pre-Columbian and Native American visual arts. Students will be introduced to different art historical approaches and vocabulary used to study art from each of these areas. Three credits.

American Art & Media Culture: Washington to Trump (H)

AH 164
6/12/17 to 6/16/17, Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This course examines the arts and architecture of the early republic introduced in AH 163, expanding into the major movements and masters of American art from the Civil War to the present. In tracing the themes and artistic statements of American artists the course takes special notice of unifying national myths such as the Founding Fathers, Manifest Destiny, America as the new Eden, the frontier from the Rockies to the lunar surface, heroes from Davy Crockett to Superman, and America as utopia. Through the masterpieces of Church, Cole, Homer, Eakins, Sloan, Hopper, Pollock, Rothko, Wyeth, Warhol, and the Downtown art scene, the course answers the question: What is uniquely American about American art? Three credits.

Inside Museums & Galleries: Taste/Place/Public Space (H)

AH 193
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on 5/29), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This course explores the interactive role of the curator and the museum and gallery visitor in the dynamic cultural spaces of museums, galleries, and public historic spaces, parks, monuments, etc. We explore the responsibilities, ethics, and educational goals for the professional staff of not-for-profit museums in terms of serving the common good of the general public. If museums are “temples of culture,” then we need to understand the ways these public “faiths” act while open and engaging for all. In contrast, we highlight the similarities and differences when artworks or collectible objects are placed into a commercialized, for profit-gallery/auction house context. This is an introductory course, welcoming students ready to experience and learn about the rich spectrum of museums, galleries, auction houses, and cultural institutions within the Tri-State area. Field trips include visits with top professionals who share their expertise and experiences. No prerequisites. Three credits.

NOTE for Art History course titles: (H) = History

Biology Courses

Science, Technology, and Society

BI 70
7/11/16 to 8/19/16 ONLINE
This course analyzes the major science and technology issues that confront today's society. Through an examination of the underlying science, students gain an understanding of the impact these issues hold for the environment, our natural resources, and our society, including benefit versus hazard expectations. Course issues, which change to incorporate timely topics, include acid rain; agriculture; diseases such as AIDS, cancer, and heart disease; energy; genetic engineering; the greenhouse effect; ozone depletion; and water pollution. Note: This course counts as a science coure course but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor. Three credits.

Identity and the Human Genome

BI 71
7/11/16 to 7/22/16, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course introduces scientific and social aspects of human genetics to the non-science major. Topics of discussion include the structure and function of genes, human genetic diversity, Mendelian inheritance, and the ethical and legal issues related to emerging genetic technologies. Note: This course counts as a science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor. Three lectures. Three credits.

Ecology and Society

BI 75
Two sessions: Both are scheduled to run from 5/31/16 to 7/8/16 ONLINE
This course focuses on environmental issues raised by modern society's conflicting needs for land, water, a livable environment, and renewable/nonrenewable resources. Students examine the available scientific evidence and are encouraged to draw their own conclusions concerning these environmentally sensitive issues, which are presented in lectures, readings, films, and occasional, off-campus field trips (by arrangement). This course is open to all except biology majors. Note: This course serves as a natural science elective in the Program on the Environment. This course counts as a science core course but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor. Three lectures. Three credits..

Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II

BI 107-Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BI 108-Human Anatomy & Physiology II

BI 107 lecture: 6/6/16 to 7/8/16, Mon./Wed./Fri., 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
BI 107L lab: 6/7/16 to 7/7/16, Tues./Thurs., 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
BI 108 lecture: 7/11/16 to 8/12/16 Mon./Wed./Fri., 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
BI 108L lab: 7/12/16 to 8/11/16 Tues./Thurs., 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
This course is required for nursing majors as a pre-requisite for most nursing courses. A strong chemistry background is recommended. Homeostasis is the major theme of the course with form and function covered together each semester.  BI 107 introduces the student to anatomical terminology, homeostasis and feedback control, membrane physiology, and tissues followed by the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.  BI 108 continues with the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems. Laboratory work closely follows the lecture and includes microscopic anatomy (histology), use of anatomical models,  Human skeletons and dissections for study of gross anatomy, and physiology experiments including muscle recruitment measurements, cranial nerve tests, blood pressure measurements, blood typing, etc. Note: This course is not open to biology majors except where required for allied health sciences (chair approval required). Three lectures, one lab. Four credits each semester. 

General Biology I

BI 170 lecture: 6/5/17 to 7/7/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon
BI 170L lab: 6/5/17 to 7/5/17, Mon./Wed., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
This introductory course for biology majors covers the molecular and cellular basis of life, including cell structure and function, cell communication, inheritance, gene expression and regulation, and developmental genetics. Students receive hands-on experience with a broad range of topics and techniques in the accompanying laboratory. Three lectures, one lab. Four credits.

Business Courses

Legal Environment of Business

BU 211
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on Mon., 5/29), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
This course examines the broad philosophical as well as practical nature and function of the legal system, and introduces students to the legal and social responsibilities of business. The course includes an introduction to the legal system, the federal courts, Constitutional law, the United States Supreme Court, the civil process, and regulatory areas such as employment discrimination, protection of the environment, and corporate governance and securities markets. Three credits.

Chemistry Courses

General Chemistry II Lecture and Lab

CH 112 lecture: 7/10/17 to 8/11/17, Mon-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This two-semester, sequential course (CH 111-CH 112) covers atomic and molecular weights, the mole concept, Avogadro’s number, stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the electronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the elements, chemical bonding, geometrics of molecules, molecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and nonmetals, and chemistry of coordination compounds. (Co-requisite: CH 111-112 Lab) Three credits per semester.

CH 112L lab: 7/11/17 to 8/10/17, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and record observations on simple chemical systems while learning fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement skills. Experiments demonstrate and supplement concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester emphasizes weighing, filtering, titrating, using volumetric glassware, observing data, and recording and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates these techniques in experimental procedures and explores physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemical systems. One credit per semester. (Co-requisite: CH 111-112 Lecture).

Organic Chemistry I Lecture and Lab

CH 211 lecture: 6/5/17 to 7/7/17, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course, an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds, discusses common functional groups from the perspective of molecular structure. Areas of emphasis include structure and characterization, preparation or organic synthesis, and the relations of physical and chemical properties to molecular structure. Stereochemical concepts introduced early in the course are used throughout. (Prerequisite: CH 112; Co-requisite: CH 211 Lab) Three credits.

CH 211L lab: 6/6/17 to 7/6/17, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The first semester of this lab emphasizes the manipulative techniques of separation, purification, analysis, and simple syntheses. The second semester emphasizes investigative experiments, more complex synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis. (Co-requisite: CH 211-212 lecture) One credit per semester.

Organic Chemistry II Lecture and Lab

CH 212 lecture: 7/10/17 to 8/11/17, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course is a continuation of CH 211 and presents the chemistry of aromatic, carbonyl, acyl, and nitrogen compounds. The course relates the chemical properties of naturally occurring substances such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids to those of simpler monofunctional compounds. Spectroscopic methods of structure determination are introduced early in the course and used throughout. (Prerequisite: CH 211; Co-requisite: CH 212 Lab) Three credits.

CH 212L lab: 7/11/17 to 8/10/17, Tues./Wed./Thurs., 12:30 p.m to 4:30 p.m.
The first semester of this lab emphasizes the manipulative techniques of separation, purification, analysis, and simple syntheses. The second semester emphasizes investigative experiments, more complex synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis. (Co-requisite: CH 211-212 lecture) One credit per semester.

Communication Courses

Human Communication Theories

CO 100
5/30/17 - 7/8/17 ONLINE
This course introduces major theoretical perspectives that inform communication scholarship. This foundational course for the major emphasizes understanding human communication as a symbolic process that creates, maintains, and alters personal, social, and cultural identities. Students critique research literature in the communication field in this course, which is a prerequisite for the 200- and 300-level communication courses. This course counts in the social and behavioral sciences core curriculum for non-majors. All CO majors must fulfill their social science core requirements outside of the major. Three credits.

Argument and Advocacy

CO 101
5/30/17 - 7/8/17 ONLINE
This introduction to public speaking and the advocacy process includes topic identification; methods of organization, research, selection, and arrangement of support materials; audience analysis and adaptation; patterns and fallacies of reasoning; uses of evidence; logical proof; and refutation. Students practice and critique informative and persuasive presentations in this course, which is a skill required in all 200- and 300-level communication courses. Three credits.

Interpersonal Communication Theories

CO 200
7/10/17 - 8/19/17 ONLINE
An examination of one-to-one relationships from a variety of theoretical perspectives, this course focuses on the centrality of communication in building familial bonds, friendships, and work teams. Students examine factors influencing interpersonal communication such as language, perception, nonverbal behavior, power, status, and gender roles. (Prerequisite: CO 100) Three credits.

Intercultural Communication

CO 240
5/30/17 - 7/8/17 ONLINE
This course deals with challenges to communication between people of different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing the ways communication practices reveal cultural values and the role of communication in creating and sustaining cultural identities. Students discuss how differences in value orientation, perception, thought patterns, and nonverbal behavior cause misunderstanding, tension, and conflict in business, education, and healthcare settings. This course meets the U.S. diversity requirement (registration preference given to Communication and International Studies majors).  Three credits.

Family Communication

CO 246
7/10/17 - 7/21/17, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
In this course students come to understand how families are constituted through symbolic processes and interaction; explore the verbal and non-verbal communication behaviors that are developed and preferred in different kinds of families; learn various theories for understanding family interactions at the individual, dyadic, group, and systems levels; analyze family communication patterns using established theories and methods; connect family dynamics to social trends and processes including the roles of the mass media and popular culture; and explore ways culture, class, gender, and sexuality affect and are affected by family structures, roles, and communication patterns. Three credits. 

Internship: Summer 2017 semester

CO 399
Contact Dr. Qin Zhang for details at qzhang@fairfield.edu
Communication internships provide students with first-hand knowledge about the field of work, allow them to experience new professional activities and relationships, help them apply conceptual knowledge and skills in communication in the work environment, and allow them to experience the problems and successes of efficiently and effectively communicating within a complex organization. One three-credit internship course can be used toward the major. Students may take an internship twice for credit, one to three credits per semester. (Prerequisites: 2.8 overall GPA and junior or senior status) One to three credits per semester; six-credit limit. 

Economics

Introduction to Microeconomics

EC 11
Two sessions:
5/30/17 to 7/8/17 ONLINE
7/10/17 to 7/21/17, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
This course analyzes the behavior of individual consumers and producers as they deal with the economic problem of allocating scarce resources. The course examines how markets function to establish prices and quantities through supply and demand, how resource costs influence firm supply, and how variations in competition levels affect economic efficiency. Topics may include antitrust policy, the distribution of income, the role of government, and environmental problems. The course includes computer applications. Three credits.

Introduction to Macroeconomics

EC 12
Two sessions:
6/5/17 to 6/29/17, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. - 9:55 p.m.
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course develops models of the aggregate economy to determine the level of output, income, prices, and unemployment in an economy. In recognition of the growing importance of global economic activity, these models incorporate the international sector. The course examines and evaluates the role of public economic policy, including fiscal and monetary policy. Topics may include growth theory and price stability. The course includes computer applications. Three credits.

Health Economics

EC 140
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course begins by applying microeconomic theory to the health sector of the U.S. economy. The U.S. experience will be generalized to global health issues and alternative health care systems. Topics include the demand for health care and health insurance, managed care and the role of government, physician compensation, and specialty choice, the role of nurses and other healthcare professionals, the hospital sector, and medical cost inflation. Three credits.

English

Texts and Contexts II: Writing About Literature

EN 12
7/10/17 - 8/19/17 ONLINE
English 12 builds on the reading, writing, and critical inquiry work of English 11, focusing on the development of increasingly sophisticated reading, writing, researching and inquiry skills through the exploration of literary texts and their contexts. Students will practice close reading techniques, be introduced to key terms and concepts in literary study, and practice writing in a variety of academic and creative genres. The course is intended to foster greater appreciation for the power of literature and literary study as a foundation to all the liberal arts. Designated sections may meet the U.S. or world diversity requirement. Three credits.

Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies

EN 101
6/1/17 to 6/30/17 ONLINE
This course allows students to develop ways of reading, analyzing, and interacting with texts in English from around the globe. You will focus on such questions as: How are literary texts produced? How do local, national, and global cultures and events affect the way authors’ fashion their texts? Do literary works produced in different cultures at the same time "speak to each other" across time and space? The course will be run as a combination of lecture and small group discussion and will make use of web-based background materials to provide context and depth to the readings. This course meets the world diversity requirement. Three credits. (B)

Irish Literature

EN 161
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
The course studies the deep connections between the literature and history of Ireland from 1800 to the present. Building on EN 11 and 12, it further develops the ability to read literature closely (to analyze and interpret the figurative language and stylistic features of fiction, drama, and poetry) and to write convincingly about the meanings and ideas that such close reading yields. It also adds to this skill by teaching students to recognize and articulate the inherent links between literature, history, and culture - links which are particularly evident in modern Irish writing, and which are revealed through close reading. Three credits. (B)

Creative Writing

EN/W 200
7/10/17 to 7/21/17, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
This course is designed, in large part, to offer you practice in the art of crafting literature. Therefore, we will focus much of our efforts on process—from generating material through "freewriting" and writing prompts to crafting that material into a more polished piece. We will also devote close attention to responding to the works of others—both published texts by professional authors and the developing drafts of our peers. Learning to read as a writer—being able to distinguish, consider, analyze, assess, and discuss a work’s components and their contribution to the whole—takes training and practice, and makes you a stronger writer. Our goal is also to establish a community of readers and writers who support each other’s work and growth. Three credits.

Finance

Introduction to Finance

FI 101
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course provides the building blocks for understanding the role of finance in the domestic and international environments. Specifically, in a qualitative and quantitative manner, this course addresses the three interrelated fields of finance, namely: the financial markets, investments, and business finance. Emphasis is given to such issues as forecasting and planning; investment and financing decisions; and interaction with capital markets. (Prerequisites: sophomore standing, AC 11, EC 11, EC 12, one math course.) Three credits.

FI 215
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on Mon., 5/29), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
The analysis of optimal financial decision-making for corporate financial managers emphasizes corporate investment, financing, and dividend decisions within the framework of efficient capital markets. Further, the course explores the topics of cash budgeting, real options, economic value added, mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcy, and corporate risk management. (Prerequisite: FI 101, Junior Standing) Three credits.

History

Origins of the Modern World Since 1500

HI 10
Two sessions:
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
7/10/17 to 8/4/17, Mon.-Fri., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
The course, which examines the history of Europe and its relationship to the world from the end of the Middle Ages through the 19th century, emphasizes the cultural, social, economic, and political forces and structures that led to the development of commercial and industrial capitalism, and the effects of this development on Europe, the New World, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation; the Transatlantic Slave Trade; European expansion and colonialism; the development of strong nation states; the Enlightenment; the Industrial Revolution and conflicting ideological and political responses; changing social, family, and gender relationships; and the increasing interaction of Europeans and non-Europeans. Critical analysis of primary and secondary sources develops skills in historical methodology that are of great value in many other academic pursuits. Written assignments and class discussions enhance these skills. (Not open to students who have completed HI 30) Three credits.

Twentieth Century United States

HI 239
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
The course surveys developments in American social, political, and economic life since 1900. Major themes include problems of advanced industrial society, the growing government role in the economy, America's growing role in the world, and social movements of the 1930s and 1960s. Ethnic and cultural diversity within American society receive attention. The course meets the U.S. diversity requirement.  Three credits.

Information Studies

Introduction to Information Systems

IS 100
6/5/17 to 6/30/17 ONLINE
This course helps students understand the role of Information Systems in the contemporary business environment. It introduces them to the use of information systems concepts and techniques in solving a wide range of business problems. Working in small teams, students develop, analyze, and present solutions to a business problem using information technology. Three credits.

International Studies

United Nations Security Council Crisis Simulation
IL 197
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on Mon., May 29), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This course gives students a hands-on learning experience in world diversity by simulating a United Nations Security Council crisis in international peace and security. The objective is to introduce students to the challenges of global governance in light of the different perspectives they encounter representing different constituencies of the UN Security Council who come from diverse cultural, historical, and geo-political regions of the world. A key goal of the course is to bring to light whether and how power disparities limit the global South's effective representation, and the stakes in reform of the Security Council. While the topic of the simulation will vary, the focus is on a crisis in a non-Western region of the world. This course meets the world diversity requirement. Three credits.

Marketing

Principles of Marketing

MK 101
5/30/17 to 7/8/17 ONLINE
This course introduces the fundamental concepts and theories that drive day-to-day marketing decisions. A thorough understanding of the marketplace (consumer or business-to-business) is at the heart of such decision making. In this course, students will learn to identify and satisfy customer’s wants and needs. The core tools that enable managers to move from decision-making to action are addressed, namely: product development, pricing, channel management and structure, and promotions (including advertising and sales). Additional topics include global marketing, societal and marketing ethics, and digital marketing. Students are required to work in a team to construct a marketplace analysis for a chosen product/service. (Prerequisite: sophomore standing) Three credits.

Consumer Behavior

MK 212
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course provides students with an understanding of the behavior of consumers in the marketplace, using an interdisciplinary approach that employs concepts from such fields as economics, psychology, social psychology, sociology, and psychoanalysis. Topics include motivation, perception, attitudes, consumer search, and post-transactional behavior. (Prerequisites: MK 101, junior or senior standing) Three credits.

Mathematics

Pre-Calculus

MA 11
7/10/17 to 8/4/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Topics in this course include: algebra; linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions from a descriptive, algebraic, numerical and graphical point of view; limits and continuity. Primary emphasis is on techniques needed for calculus. This course does not count toward the mathematics core require­ment, and is meant to be taken only by students who are required to take MA 119, MA 145 or MA 171 for their majors, but who do not have a strong enough mathematics background. Three credits.

Introduction to Probability and Statistics

MA 17
Two sessions:
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
7/10/17 to 8/3/17, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. - 9:55 p.m.
This introduction to the theory of statistics includes measures of central tendency, variance, Chebyshev's theorem, probability theory, binomial distribution, normal distribution, the central limit theorem, and estimating population means for large samples. Students who have received credit for any mathematics course at the 100-level or higher may not take this course for credit without the permission of the department chair. Three credits.

Applied Calculus I

MA 119
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Topics in this course include: foundations of the calculus; differentiation of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; extrema and curve sketching; applications of derivatives; antiderivatives; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and integration of algebraic functions.  A graphing calculator and Wolfram Alpha are among the technologies that may be used. Students who received credit for MA 19, MA 145 or MA 171 may not take MA 119 for credit. Three credits. 

Applied Calculus II

MA 120
7/10/17 to 8/4/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Topics in this course include: applications of the derivative, including implicit differentiation, related rates and linear approximation; integration of algebraic, transcendental and trigonometric functions; differentiation of trigonometric functions; techniques of integration; applications of the definite integral; infinite series.  A graphing calculator and Wolfram Alpha are among the technologies that may be used. Students who receive credit for any one of MA 120, MA 146 or MA 172 may not receive credit for either of the other two. Three credits.

Music

The History and Development of Rock (H)

MU 102
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on Monday, 5/29) Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
This course surveys the musical and social trends that resulted in the emergence of rock and roll as an important musical and cultural force in America. The course traces the roots of rock, blues, and country styles, showing how they merged with popular music. Students examine periods from the 1950s to the present, along with Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, the Beatles, the British invasion, folk music, Bob Dylan, jazz and art rock, Jimi Hendrix, the west coast movement, and the music industry. Students learn to understand, discuss, and differentiate between stylistic periods and their historical relevance to American culture. This course meets the U.S. diversity requirement. Three credits.

History of Music: 1700-1964 (H)

MU 104
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course explores the ways in which composers manipulated musical language to meet the growing demands of the middle class. After learning the basic elements of music, students explore the world of the Enlightenment and Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. In the romantic period, the course explores the interaction of all the arts and the influence of politics and econom­ics on compositional style. With the dawn of the 20th century, the course explores what “modern” means, learns about attempts to expand and replace musical language, and studies the impact of American culture on music. Three credits

Hip-Hop and its Antecedents (H)

MU 201
5/30/17 to 7/8/17 ONLINE
This class explores the musical, cultural, political and aesthetic foundations of hip-hop. We will trace the corporeal, visual, spoken word, literary and musical antecedents to and manifestations of hip-hop in American cultural. Students will investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to various hip-hop idioms. We will analyze the effects of corporate America and examine the images and ideas presented by an industry driven by profit. Are we really in a post-racial society? How does hip-hop help us understand race, class, gender, power, and oppression? This course meets the U.S. diversity requirement. Three credits.

NOTE for Music course titles: (H) = History

Operations Management

Operations Management

OM 101
6/5/17 to 6/30/17 ONLINE
This course provides the primary exposure to service and manufacturing operations management within the business core curriculum. Topics include process modeling, quality management and control, decision analysis, capacity planning, supply chain management, and project planning and control. Special attention is given to showing how concepts and models presented in lectures and readings apply to real-world business situations. Examples of international operations are studied, and ethical issues are explored within the context of decisions such as where to locate facilities. (Prerequisites: sophomore standing and one statistics course) Three credits.

Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

PH 101
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
This course is a topical introduction to philosophy. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the vocation of wonder and questioning by engaging students in discussions about some of the basic questions of philosophy.  Students will read texts from historical and contemporary writers, and will be asked to develop their own skills of thinking, reading, and writing critically.  Note: Students with credit for PH 10 may not receive credit for PH 101.  Three Credits. 

Existentialism

PH 209
7/10/17 to 8/4/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
The word, ‘existentialism’ describes a particular attitude toward the creation of meaning out of an inherently meaningless existence. Despite the diversity within the tradition, the ‘existentialists’ of the 19th and 20th century often address questions pertaining to human freedom and responsibility, values and nihilism, anguish and affirmation, authenticity, and the absurd. This course traces how existentialism has answered these questions. In so doing, students are encouraged to rethink the foundation of their own existence and personal values, while understanding the implications of Dostoyevsky’s “If God is dead, then everything is permitted” and Sartre’s “Man is condemned to be free.” (Prerequisite: PH 10 or PH 101) Three credits.

Physics

General Physics I

PS 115
6/5/17 to 6/30/17 Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This introductory course - for students concentrating in physics, mathematics, chemistry, or engineering - covers mechanics, heat, and fluid dynamics. It also includes rigorous mathematical derivations using integral and differential calculus. Topics include velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, power momentum, torque, vibratory motion, elastic properties of solids, fluids at rest and in motion, properties of gases, measurement and transfer of heat, and elementary thermodynamics. Corequisite MA 145 or equivalent (or higher). Three credits.

Lab for General Physics I

PS 115L
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This lab course engages students in experimental measurements spanning the areas of mechanics and thermal stresses on matter, with the objective of training students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation, providing depth to students' understanding of the phenomena taught in PS 15. Specific experimental measurements include accelerated motion, periodic motion, gravitational force, ballistics, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational dynamics, and measurements of the coefficient of linear expansion and the heat of fusion. Students complete a weekly lab report. Corequisite PS 15. One credit.

General Physics II

PS 116
7/10/17 to 8/4/17, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This continuation of PS 15 covers electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and sound. Topics include magnetism and electricity; simple electric circuits; electrical instruments; generators and motors; characteristics of wave motion; light and illumination; reflection; refraction, interference; polarization of light, color, and the spectrum; and production and detection of sound waves. Three credits. 

General Physics II Lab

PS 116L
7/10/17 TO 8/4/17, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This laboratory provides students with a greater understanding of electromagnetic phenomena, wave phenomena, and optics, and supports PS 16. Measurements of microscopic quantities, like the charge and mass of the electron, give students an opportunity to explore the structure of matter. Other experiments involve the physics of electrical currents, electric properties of bulk matter, magnetic fields and their effect on beams, wave phenomena, and the nature of light and its interaction with optical materials. This course trains students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation. Students complete a weekly lab report. One credit.

The Nature of the Universe

PS 78
7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This course, intended for non-science majors, reviews the scientific field of cosmology, or the nature of the physical universe, from a historical perspective. Beginning with the ancients, the course traces the development of cosmological principles through the Greek and Egyptian era of Aristotle, C. Ptolemy, and others; the 16th and 17th centuries of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton; and the cosmology of the 20th century based upon Einstein's theories of relativity coupled with several fundamental observations. This leads to an examination of the current model of the universe, which is based upon the Big Bang theory. Three credits. 

Fundamentals of Astronomy

PS 87
5/30/17 to 7/8/17 ONLINE
This course introduces students who are not majoring in science to the principal areas, traditional and contemporary, of astronomy. Traditional topics include a historical background to astronomy, telescopes, the sun, the moon, the major and minor planets, comets, and meteors. After discussing these subjects in detail, the course covers areas appropriate to modern astronomy such as the composition and evolution of stars, star clusters, quasars, pulsars, black holes, and cosmological models. Three credits.

Politics

United Nations Security Council Crisis Simulation

PO 127
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on Mon., May 29),
Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This course gives students a hands-on learning experience in world diversity by simulating a United Nations Security Council crisis in international peace and security. The objective is to introduce students to the challenges of global governance in light of the different perspectives they encounter representing different constituencies of the UN Security Council who come from diverse cultural, historical, and geo-political regions of the world. A key goal of the course is to bring to light whether and how power disparities limit the global South's effective representation, and the stakes in reform of the Security Council. While the topic of the simulation will vary, the focus is on a crisis in a non-Western region of the world. This course meets the world diversity requirement. Three credits.

United States Foreign Policy

PO 133
5/30/17 to 7/8/17 ONLINE
This course examines the impact of domestic and international actors and processes in the formation and conduct of United States foreign policy. It provides a historical background on the basis of which it analyzes contemporary United States economic and security (broadly understood) foreign policy in different regions of the world, including Asia, Europe and the Middle East.  Three credits.

Psychology

General Psychology

PY 101
Two sessions:
5/30/17 to 7/15/17 ONLINE
7/10/17 to 7/21/17, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course introduces the science of mental processes and behavior by addressing a range of questions including: How is brain activity related to thought and behavior? What does it mean to learn and remember something? How do we see, hear, taste, and smell? How do we influence one another's attitudes and actions? What are the primary factors that shape a child's mental and emotional development? How and why do we differ from one another? What are the origins and most effective treatments of mental illness? Three credits.

Developmental Psychology for Non-Majors

PY 111
5/30/17 to 7/15/17 ONLINE
The course encompasses a developmental psychology approach to the growth of the individual from birth to old age, tracing motor, perceptual, language, cognitive, and emotional growth and emphasizing normal devel­opment. Psychology majors and students who have taken PY 211 or PY 212 may not take this course. Psychology majors are required to take PY 211 or 212. Designated sections meet the U.S. diversity require­ment. Three credits.

Psychology and the Law

PY 122
5/24/17 to 5/31/17 (no class on 5/29 due to Memorial Day), Wed.-Wed., 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Implicit psychological assumptions about human behavior and how it should be controlled form the basis for the legal system, particularly our criminal justice system, from its code to its enforcement. This course examines those assumptions in light of current psycho-legal theory and research. It covers the treat­ment of traditional psychiatric populations (the mentally ill, mentally retarded, homeless) by the justice system in contrast to that received by normal people; clinical issues such as the insanity defense, predicting danger­ousness, the validity of psychiatric examinations and lie detectors; and jury selection, eyewitness testimony, decision-making, sentencing, and parole. Three credits.

Religious Studies

Exploring Religion: Peoples of the Book, Sacred Texts and their Communities

RS 101E
Two Sessions: Both are scheduled to run from
5/30/17 to 7/8/17 ONLINE
This section examines the relationship between sacred text and the historical communities of Judaism, Christianity and Isam. Focusing on shared narratives, such as Adam and Eve in the Garden, the course illustrates the different ways that texts are interpreted and the various roles that Scripture plays in these communities.

Good News of the Gospels

RS 221
6/5/17 to 6/30/17, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
This course examines the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John according to contemporary exegetical and literary methodologies. The course examines and compares the theological positions of early Christianity as represented by each writer and by other early Christian gospels. Three credits.

Evil

RS 238
6/5/17 to 6/29/17, Mon./Tues./Thurs., 6:45 p.m. to 9:55 p.m.
This course explores the problem of evil from the perspectives of theology and philosophy. The course considers God and evil, classical theodicies (reasonable justifications of God before the prevalence of evil), modern philosophical accounts of evil, social evil, and the possibility of belief in the face of evil. Within the context of these subjects, the course addresses the following questions: What is evil? What are the roots of evil? What effect does one's understanding of evil have on one's understanding of the human being, of God, and of religion? What is our responsibility in the face of evil? (Prerequisite: RS 101) Three credits.

Contemporary Moral Problems

RS 252
Two Sessions: Both are scheduled to run from 7/10/17 to 8/19/17 ONLINE
This theological examination of contemporary moral problems considers selected ethical issues in contemporary society and leading approaches to moral decision-making. The course investigates moral problems such as euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, the death penalty, violence and just war theory, bioethics, sexual and reproductive ethics, global poverty, environmental ethics, and issues in business and legal ethics.  Three credits.

Studio Art

Color Workshop (A)

SA 105
7/10/17 to 7/21/17, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
This course investigates fundamental color theory through studio projects using contemporary and historical references. Students focus on the development and exploration of ideas using a variety of color media and study the practical mixing and application of pigments. The course stresses perception, visual awareness, sensitivity, attitude, and judgment, and is typically offered fall semester. This course is designed to be open and accessible to all students. Three credits.

NOTE for SA 105 course title: (A) = Applied

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