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Summer Course Registration

Summer 2024 course registration is open! 

We welcome visiting students. Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to discuss the variety of summer undergraduate courses and to obtain permission to register for summer courses with prerequisites.

Two-Week May/June Online Courses

These two-week intensive online courses will run from Monday, May 20, 2024 to Friday, May 31, 2024 and may require advance preparation prior to the start of class. Students who register for a course will be e-mailed a syllabus to their student Gmail account. 

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, May 15, 2024

Identity and the Human Genome
BIOL 1071 (01) (CRN 51048) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 Two-week course - ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Olivia Harriott
This course section fulfills a MSID Signature Element requirement and a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement.
This course introduces human genetics to the non-science major. Topics of discussion include the structure and function of genes, modes of inheritance, gene editing, sex and gender, race, and human genetic diversity. Special emphasis is placed on ethical, legal and social issues related to the knowledge and application of genetic information. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor.

Family Communication
COMM 2246 (01) (CRN 51497) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 Two week course synchronous and asynchronous online. The synchronous portion meets Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m. to 12 noon. There are no zoom meetings on 5/27 and 5/31.
Professor: Margaret Wills
This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
In this course students come to understand how families are constituted through symbolic processes and interaction; explore the verbal and non-verbal communication behaviors that are developed and preferred in different kinds of families; learn various theories for understanding family interactions at the individual, dyadic, group, and systems levels; analyze family communication patterns using established theories and methods; connect family dynamics to social trends and processes including the roles of the mass media and popular culture; and explore ways culture, class, gender, and sexuality affect and are affected by family structures, roles, and communication patterns. Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or COMM 1102 or COMM 1130
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Critical Issues in American Popular Music: Blues to Hip Hop
MUSC 1132 (01) (CRN 51153) 
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Brian Torff
This course section fulfills a MSJR Signature Element requirement. This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course provides an in-depth look at the important musical, social, and racial issues in American popular music, from the media exploitation of the blues in the 1920s through current issues in hip hop. Subject areas will include blues and its origins, jazz and modernism, the obstacles of race in music, the death of rhythm and blues, rock's evolution in the 1950s, rap and hip hop culture, and issues in both postmodernism and perverse as seen by many music and art critics. 

Introduction to American Politics
POLI 1101 (01) (CRN 51070) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Gwendoline Alphonso
This course section fulfills a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement.
A central purpose of this two-week online course is to introduce and explore the politics and workings of American governance. The stakes for the study of American politics have never been higher. As political polarization intensifies, now at levels not experienced since the American Civil War, and the political environment is saturated by negative partisanship, rancor and disinformation; it is only by developing a thorough, systematic, evidence-based understanding of American politics that we can form informed perspectives, understand the views of others, and identify our own role in sustaining American democracy. Through the course we will focus on “big ideas” and adopt a “political development” perspective, understanding contemporary American politics as part of the evolution of American political ideas, institutions, and interests. We will explore both foundational and historical trends, watershed events, as well as breaking and contemporary national political developments related to presidential and congressional elections, and important social and economic policies, such as abortion, marijuana, immigration, voting. Attributes: Politics Major American Politics (PMAP), American Studies Gateway Course. Satisfies “social science” requirement in the Magis Core, and Social Justice 1 Requirement in the Magis Core.

Special Topics: Religious Ethics and Speculative Fiction
RLST 2900 (01) (CRN 51494) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 ONLINE in asynchronous and synchronous sessions. Synchronous Zoom sessions to be determined by class agreement.
Professor: Sara Williams
This course uses various frameworks in religious ethics to examine social issues as they are represented in science fiction, fantasy, magical. realism, and other speculative fiction genres. Students will explore issues such as climate change, racism, gentrification, and emerging technologies as they are portrayed in fictional worlds to spark their religious and moral imaginations in regard to the ethics of these issues in our own world.
Prerequisite: One 1000-level religious studies course.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Criminal Justice System Seminar
Course will be held both Online and On-Campus
ONLINE: SOCI 2220 (01) (CRN 51216) (3 credits)
ON-CAMPUS: SOCI 2220 (03) (CRN 51631) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 Mon.-Fri., 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Professor: Rose Rodrigues
This seminar explores in detail the workings and problems of the criminal justice system in the United States. In addition to investigating the sources of criminal behavior, the course focuses on the arraignment process, probation, the trial, sentencing, prison reform, and parole.

Summer Session I: May/June Courses

Intermediate Accounting I
ACCT 2203 (01) (CRN 51197) (3 credits) 
5/21/24 – 6/19/24 Tues./Wed./Thurs., 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. plus Mon., 6/3/24 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. ONLINE
Professor: Scott Brenner
This course builds on the fundamental concepts of financial accounting and reporting covered in Introduction to Financial Accounting. It provides an in-depth study of financial accounting theory and concepts, including balance sheet valuations and their relationship to income measurement and determination, as well as the presentation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Using a practice set, students create financial statements from transactions to reinforce their knowledge of the accounting cycle. Prerequisite: ACCT 1011.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Database Systems
DATA 3260 (01) (CRN 51343) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: TBA
This course covers fundamental database concepts, such as tables and queries, using Microsoft Access. Students then gain hands-on knowledge with the industry-standard database language, Structured Query Language (SQL). A semester-wide project helps students bring together learned concepts. Students also learn how to use a popular data analytics software, Alteryx. Prerequisite: DATA 1101. 
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Sports Analytics
DATA 3335 (01) (CRN 51499) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Bianca Gadze
Virtually every sport has been improved in recent years with the introduction and widespread acceptance of analytical methods. Analytics help leagues, teams, referees, coaches, athletes, agents, and fans appreciate their favorite sports on a higher level. In this course, students will gain a broad perspective on the methods, findings, impact, and controversies within sports analytics across a variety of sports and e-sports, learn how to analytically evaluate and compare differing perspectives, and practice communicating findings to a non-analytical audience in an impactful and actionable way. Prerequisite: DATA 1101
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

 

Biological Anthropology
ANTH 1200 (01) (CRN 51073) (3 credits) 
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Kimberly Raymond
The study of natural selection, primate evolution, and living primate societies provides a baseline from which to study the evolution of the human species. The course also traces human cultural and social development from the foraging bands of the first humans to the civilizations that appeared at the dawn of written history. Students also examine physical variation among living populations. This course meets the core science requirement and NOT the social science requirement.

Business Ethics
AETH 2291 (01) (CRN 51043) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: James Ong
This course investigates ethical problems in business practice. Topics include the foundation of the free-market system, personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; codes of ethics, obligations to employees and other stakeholders; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing, and company loyalty; self and government regulation; the logic and future of capitalism; and the changing responsibilities of the manager in a rapidly globalizing business environment. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Art of Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
AHST 1103 (01) (CRN 51495) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Dawn Pilotti
This course meets the world diversity requirement.
This course is an introduction to art and architecture of Africa, the Caribbean islands, and Central America, South America, and North America. Major works of art and architecture will be examined to understand the respective cultures and traditions of these regions. Cultures designated by their geographical locations will provide a frame of study for African visual culture. Art of Caribbean islands and the influence of the African diaspora will be explored. The Americas will be represented by Pre-Columbian and Native American visual arts. Students will be introduced to different art historical approaches and vocabulary used to study art from each of these areas.

Fundamentals of Biology I
BIOL 1015 (01) (CRN 51488) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Geoffrey Church
This course, an introductory study of biology for the non-science major, familiarizes students with the general biological principles that govern the activities of all living systems. Concepts include the biochemical origin of life, cellular morphology and physiology, and human genetics. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor.

Bioinspiration: Innovation Inspired by Nature
BIOL 1020 (01) (CRN 51046) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Christine Rodriguez
This course section fulfills a MWAC Signature Element requirement and a MSID Signature Element requirement.
This course introduces topics in Biology which have inspired developments in technology to the non-science major. Special emphasis is placed on ethical and social issues related to the knowledge and application of these technologies. Topics include biomimicry, antibiotics, gene editing, synthetic biology, and more. Through the semester, students will work together to design a bioengineering solution to an existing problem in nature. Note: This course counts as a natural science interdisciplinary core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor.

Identity and the Human Genome
BIOL 1071 (01) (CRN 51048) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 Two-week course - ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Olivia Harriott
This course section fulfills a MSID Signature Element requirement and a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement.
This course introduces human genetics to the non-science major. Topics of discussion include the structure and function of genes, modes of inheritance, gene editing, sex and gender, race, and human genetic diversity. Special emphasis is placed on ethical, legal and social issues related to the knowledge and application of genetic information. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor.

Environmental Science
BIOL 1076 (01) (CRN 51049) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: James Biardi
This course fulfills a MSID Signature Element requirement.
The science of the environment is presented through examination of the interconnections among physical, chemical, and biological fields of inquiry. This course looks at how the global environment is altered by the human population, technology, and production of fuels and food. In this course, students will acquire a scientific understanding of current issues in environmental science and learn to evaluate claims about current environmental problems. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology or chemistry major or minor.

Introduction to Marine Science
BIOL 1078 (01) (CRN 51187) (3 credits) 
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Shannon Gerry
This course fulfills MSID and MWAC Signature Element requirements.
This course introduces the non-science major and the marine science minor to the field of oceanography. Topics dealing with the geological, physical, chemical, and biological aspects of science underscore the interdisciplinary nature of world ocean study. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology major or minor.

Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 1107 lecture (01) (CRN 51183) (4 credits) Corequisite: BIOL 1107L
5/20/24 – 6/21/24
Mon./Wed., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. plus Fri., 6/21/24, 8 a.m. – 10 a.m. ONLINE
Tues./Thurs., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. ON CAMPUS
BIOL 1107L lab (01) (CRN 51050) (0 credits) 
5/21/24 – 6/20/24, Tues./Thurs., 10:05 a.m. – 12:55 p.m. ON CAMPUS
Professor: Anthony DeCristofaro
$120 Science Lab Fee
This course is required for nursing majors as a prerequisite for most nursing courses. A strong chemistry background is recommended. Homeostasis is the major theme of the course with form and function covered together each semester. This course introduces the student to anatomical terminology, homeostasis and feedback control, membrane physiology, and tissues followed by the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Laboratory work closely follows the BI 1107 lecture and includes microscopic anatomy (histology), use of virtual cadaver (Anatomage Table), anatomical models, human skeletons, and dissections for study of gross anatomy, and physiology experiments including muscle recruitment measurements, reflex tests and cranial nerve tests.
Note: This course is not open to biology majors except where required for allied health sciences (chair approval required)

Culinary Chemistry
CHEM 1073 (01) (CRN 51503) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Aaron Van Dyke
This course explores the chemical transformations underlying common culinary processes. Students will gain a molecular-level appreciation of culinary context (salt, fat, acid, heat) and execution (grilling, baking, braising, fermentation). Special attention will be given to data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Students will explore course concepts through hands-on homework. Because cooking is shared across cultures, this class will also devote time to questions of food access, security, and human health. Note: This course counts as a science core course but does not satisfy the requirements for the chemistry major or minor.

General Chemistry I Lecture and Lab
CHEM 1171 Lecture (01) (CRN 51142) (3 credits) 
5/20/24 – 6/21/24 Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. - 10 a.m. HYBRID
ON CAMPUS: Tues., Wed. and Thurs.
ONLINE: Mon. and Fri. 
Professor: Mary Khalili
This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, covers atomic and molecular weights, the mole concept, Avogadro's number, stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the electronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the elements, chemical bonding, geometrics of molecules, molecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and nonmetals, and chemistry of coordination compounds. 
Corequisite: CHEM 1171L
CHEM 1171L Lab (01) (CRN 51143) (1 Credit)
5/21/24 – 6/20/24 Tues., Wed. and Thurs., from 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. ON CAMPUS
Professor: Mary Khalili
$120 Science Lab Free
This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and record observations on simple chemical systems while learning fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement skills. Experiments demonstrate and supplement concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester emphasizes weighing, filtering, titrating, using volumetric glassware, observing data, and recording and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates these techniques in experimental procedures and explores physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemical systems. 
Corequisite: CHEM 1171

Organic Chemistry I Lecture and Lab
CHEM 2271 Lecture (01) (CRN 51146) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/21/24 Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. HYBRID
ON CAMPUS: Tues., Wed., Thurs. and select Fridays (for exams)
ONLINE: Mon.
Professor: Mehrnaz Kamal
This course, an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds, discusses common functional groups from the perspective of molecular structure. Areas of emphasis include structure and characterization, preparation or organic synthesis, and the relations of physical and chemical properties to molecular structure. Stereochemical concepts introduced early in the course are used throughout.
Corequisite: CHEM 2271L
Prerequisite: CHEM 1172
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.
CHEM 2271L Lab (01) (CRN 51147) (1 credit)

5/21/24 – 6/20/24 Tues., Wed. and Thurs., 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. ON CAMPUS 
Professor: Mehrnaz Kamal
$120 Science Lab Fee
This lab emphasizes the manipulative techniques of separation, purification, analysis, and simple syntheses.
Corequisite: CHEM 2271
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Human Communication Theories
COMM 1100 (01) (CRN 51090) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Qin Zhang
This course section fulfills a MWAC Signature Element requirement.
This course introduces major theoretical perspectives that inform communication scholarship. This foundational course for the major emphasizes understanding human communication as a symbolic process that creates, maintains, and alters personal, social, and cultural identities. Students critique research literature in the communication field. This course counts in the social and behavioral sciences core curriculum for non-majors.

Intercultural Communication
COMM 2240 (01) (CRN 51092) (3 credits) 
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE
Professor: Qin Zhang
This course section fulfills a MSJ2 Signature Element requirement and meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course deals with challenges to communication between people of different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing the ways communication practices reveal cultural values and the role of communication in creating and sustaining cultural identities. Students discuss how differences in value orientation, perception, thought patterns, and nonverbal behavior cause misunderstanding, tension, and conflict in business, education, and healthcare settings. Registration preference given to Communication and International Studies majors.
Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or COMM 1102 or INST 1050.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Family Communication
COMM 2246 (01) (CRN 51497) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 Two week course synchronous and asynchronous online. The synchronous portion meets Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m. to 12 noon. There are no zoom meetings on 5/27 and 5/31.
Professor: Margaret Wills
This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
In this course students come to understand how families are constituted through symbolic processes and interaction; explore the verbal and non-verbal communication behaviors that are developed and preferred in different kinds of families; learn various theories for understanding family interactions at the individual, dyadic, group, and systems levels; analyze family communication patterns using established theories and methods; connect family dynamics to social trends and processes including the roles of the mass media and popular culture; and explore ways culture, class, gender, and sexuality affect and are affected by family structures, roles, and communication patterns. Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or COMM 1102 or COMM 1130
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Introduction to Microeconomics
ECON 1011 (01) (CRN 51054) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: William Vasquez-Mazariegos
This course analyzes the behavior of individual consumers and producers as they deal with the economic problem of allocating scarce resources. The course examines how markets function to establish prices and quantities through supply and demand, how resource costs influence firm supply, and how variations in competition levels affect economic efficiency. Topics may include antitrust policy, the distribution of income, the role of government, and environmental problems.

Fair Trade and Microfinance
ECON 3237 (01) (CRN 51493) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24
Professor: Helena Keefe
This course section fulfills a MSJ2 and a MSID Signature Element requirement.
Fair trade and microfinance are two very important trends aiding the development of poor countries around the world. In this project-based course, will learn about the challenges of producing and distributing fair trade products, bringing them to market, and accessing funding to pay for expanding one’s business or materials to increase production. Prerequisites: ECON 1011, ECON 1012
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
ENGL 1001 (01) (CRN 51150) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Mary Laughlin
This course section fulfills the MSJ1 Signature Element requirement.
This course introduces students to the academic discipline of rhetoric and composition. Students read nonfiction texts, including rhetoric and composition and cross-disciplinary scholarship, in order to analyze their conventions and craft texts in various genres and modalities for a range of audiences. Students develop effective writing processes, sound research strategies, strong academic arguments, rhetorical awareness, and sensitivity to disciplinarity. The course prepares students to transfer this knowledge to their compositions across the curriculum and across contexts. 

Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies
ENGL 1010 (01) (CRN 51097) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Christopher Madden
This course meets the World Diversity requirement.
This course allows students to develop ways of reading, analyzing, and interacting with texts in English from around the globe. You will focus on such questions as: How are literary texts produced? How do local, national, and global cultures and events affect the way authors fashion their texts? Do literary works produced in different cultures at the same time "speak to each other" across time and space? The course will be run as a combination of lecture and small group discussion and will make use of web-based background materials to provide context and depth to the readings.

Ethnic American Literature
ENGL 1230 (01) (CRN 51515) (3 credits)
5/20/24 - 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor:
Gail Bellas
This course focuses on stories from writers whose countries came in contact with American colonization. The course examines postcolonial themes in a historical context, and asks what it means to be a writer whose identity is formed by the diasporic flight of one's people. We begin with theorizing postcoloniality and move to a study of 20th century writing by Puerto Rican, Filipino, Vietnamese, and other ethnic American writers. Topics include the influences of English on vernacular literatures and the relationship of the postcolonial to contemporary politics and art.

Business Writing
ENGL 1832 (01) (CRN 51360) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Rachel Robinson-Zetzer
This course investigates the demands of business writing, including designing documents that visually display information and invite readers to read either quickly or thoroughly. The course stresses theoretical issues as well as practical skills. Students practice writing skills on a variety of projects including memos, proposals, reports, collaborative writing, and writing as part of the job-hunting process. Learning goals include understanding the purposes of writing in business and industry, writing with a clear sense of audience, becoming familiar with document design and electronic communication, ethical and cross-cultural issues, and reviewing scholarly writing and research in this academic field.

Financial Management
FNCE 3215 (01) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Katsiaryna Bardos
This course examines the role of financial managers in the context of the firm. The course covers the theory and operationalization of the major financial decisions faced by financial managers. Major topics include optimal financial decision-making, capital budgeting, financing, and cash distribution decisions within the framework of firm value maximization. Prerequisite: FNCE 2101, junior standing.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Origins of the Modern World Since 1500
HIST 1100 (01) (CRN 51373) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Jonathon Awtrey
This course sections fulfills the MSJ2 Signature Element requirement.
The course, which examines the history of Europe and its relationship to the world from the end of the Middle Ages through the 19th century, emphasizes the cultural, social, economic, and political forces and structures that led to the development of commercial and industrial capitalism, and the effects of this development on Europe, the New World, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation; the Transatlantic Slave Trade; European expansion and colonialism; the development of strong nation states; the Enlightenment; the Industrial Revolution and conflicting ideological and political responses; changing social, family, and gender relationships; and the increasing interaction of Europeans and non-Europeans. Critical analysis of primary and secondary sources develops skills in historical methodology that are of great value in many other academic pursuits. Written assignments and class discussions enhance these skills.

Gandhi and Non-Violent Revolution in the 20th Century
HIST 2266 (01) (CRN 51179) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Sunil Purushotham
This course section fulfills a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement and a MWAC Signature Element requirement.
This course explores the history of the modern world through one of modernity's greatest critics, Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi was the preeminent leader of India's anti-colonial freedom struggle from the British Empire, as well as one of the most important thinkers of the 20th century. Through an exploration of Gandhi and his world, students will examine nationalism, democracy, capitalism, and imperialism and colonialism. We will use Gandhi as a point of departure for debates about the meaning of freedom, justice, and modernity itself. The course situates Gandhi's life in an age of transformation that was foundational to the modern world. Prerequisite: One 1000-level history course.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

People, Places and Global Issues
INTL 1050 (01) (CRN 51500)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Gru Han
This course fulfills a MSID Signature Element requirement and a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement. This course meets the world diversity requirement.
This course introduces students to some of the fundamental concepts of International Studies. Major world regions and selected countries within them are discussed with respect to the people, and their physical, demographic, cultural, political, and economic characteristics. Several concepts and global issues are explored, among which the physical environment, conflict, inequality, global interconnectedness, and the movement of goods and people across borders are central. This course will emphasize contemporary events, particularly as they relate to the fundamental themes covered.

Introduction to International Business
INTL 2101 (01) (CRN 51353)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Helena Keefe
This course section fulfills a MSJ2 Signature Element requirement.
The main goal of this course is to introduce students to the core concepts, topics, and issues facing businesses operating in the global market today. Students will learn about the changing business environment, international institutions, issues related to international trade and trade agreements, international financial system and exchange rates, global production and supply chain management, and global marketing. Through the study of these topics in international business, students will learn about how the global economy functions and the challenges and opportunities multinational corporations face in working with international organizations, local governments, businesses and consumers, and global competitors.

Introduction to Management
MGMT 2101 (01) (CRN 51345) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Yifeng Fan
This course integrates, through theory and its application, the various topics, concepts, and modalities that make up the Management discipline. Its purpose is twofold: 1) to provide all business students with a strong grounding in how individuals and organizations function to support the strategic goals of business, and 2) to provide a foundation for further study by management majors and minors. The course introduces students to team/group work; the relationship of business to local, national, and global communities; the ethical implications of business decisions and models; organizational behavior; human resource management; leadership and organizational culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Business Strategies in the Global Environment
MGMT 4300 (01) (CRN 51347)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Stanislav Vavilov
This capstone course, required for senior level students in the Dolan School of Business, integrates the business core through the concept of strategic management. It offers an opportunity for students to put together all they have learned in their discipline and to see the "big picture" of how business organizations function. The primary goal is to prepare students to think like top managers and to understand that strategic decision-making encompasses all parts of the organization, internal and external, bringing together all disciplines of management. The course includes lectures, readings, cases, and a capstone group project. Open to matriculated business majors only. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Negotiations and Dispute Resolution
MGMT 4360 (01) (CRN 51349) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Regina Kim
This course builds skills in negotiating and managing disputes and explores various theories concerning negotiation styles, strategy and tactics, alternative dispute resolution, and the major legal and ethical issues in the field. The course strengthens negotiation skills, introduces the many formal and informal processes available for dispute resolution, and develops managers' ability to resolve and prevent disputes. The heart of the course is a series of experiential exercises that create opportunities to practice and develop the principles learned in the course.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 

Principles of Marketing
MKTG 1101 (01) (CRN 51063) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Iman Naderi
This course introduces the fundamental concepts and theories that drive day-to-day marketing decisions. A thorough understanding of the marketplace (consumer or business-to-business) is at the heart of such decision making. In this course, students will learn to identify and satisfy customer’s wants and needs. The core tools that enable managers to move from decision-making to action are addressed, namely: product development, pricing, channel management and structure, and promotions (including advertising and sales). Additional topics include global marketing, societal and marketing ethics, and digital marketing. Students are required to work in a team to construct a marketplace analysis for a chosen product/service.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Consumer Behavior
MKTG 2212 (01) (CRN 51064) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Gerald Cavallo
This course provides students with an understanding of the behavior of consumers in the marketplace, using an interdisciplinary approach that employs concepts from such fields as economics, psychology, social psychology, sociology, and psychoanalysis. Topics include motivation, perception, attitudes, consumer search, and post-transactional behavior.
Prerequisites: MKTG 1101, junior standing.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Applied Calculus I
MATH 1121 (01) (CRN 51083) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Janet Striuli
Topics in this course include: foundations of the calculus; differentiation of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; extrema and curve sketching; applications of derivatives; antiderivatives; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and integration of algebraic functions. A graphing calculator and Wolfram Alpha are among the technologies that may be used.
Students who received credit for MATH 1141 or MATH 1171 may not take this course for credit.
Prerequisite: Precalculus 
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Statistics I
MATH 2217 (01) (CRN 51420) (3 credits)
5/20/24 - 6/21/24 ONLINE 
The first week, from 5/20/24 to 5/26/24, the course will run in an asynchronous online format.
Starting 5/28/24 (There is no class on Memorial Day 5/27), the course will meet in a synchronous online format, Monday through Thursday each week from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. plus Friday, 6/21 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Professor: Michael Herley
This introductory, calculus-based statistics course focuses on applications in business, statistics, and everyday events. Topics include descriptive statistics including mean, median, mode, standard deviation, histograms, distributions, box plots, and scatter plots; probability theory including counting rules, random variables, probability distributions, expected values, binomial and normal distributions, and the central limit theorem; inferential statistics including point estimates, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing; and regression theory. Students learn to analyze data with the aid of common software packages. Mathematics majors may not take this course as a mathematics elective. Students who have received credit for MATH 3317 or MATH 3352 may not take this course for credit. 
Prerequisites: MATH 1121 or MATH 1122 or MATH 1141 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1172
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

 

Critical Issues in American Popular Music: Blues to Hip Hop
MUSC 1132 (01) (CRN 51153) 
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Brian Torff
This course section fulfills a MSJR Signature Element requirement. This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course provides an in-depth look at the important musical, social, and racial issues in American popular music, from the media exploitation of the blues in the 1920s through current issues in hip hop. Subject areas will include blues and its origins, jazz and modernism, the obstacles of race in music, the death of rhythm and blues, rock's evolution in the 1950s, rap and hip hop culture, and issues in both postmodernism and perverse as seen by many music and art critics. 

Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1101 (01) (CRN 51180) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Jason Smith
This course section fulfills a MWAC Signature Element requirement.
This course is a topical introduction to philosophy. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the vocation of wonder and questioning by engaging students in discussions about some of the basic questions of philosophy. Students will read texts from historical and contemporary writers, and will be asked to develop their own skills of thinking, reading, and writing critically.

General Physics I
PHYS 1171 (01) (CRN 51520) (3 credits)

5/20/24 – 6/21/24 Mon.-Thurs., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 6/21/24 Fri., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Mon., Wed. plus Fri., 6/21/24 ONLINE 8 to 10 a.m.
Tues. and Thurs. ON CAMPUS 8 to 10 a.m.
Professor: Liam Sharp
This is a calculus-based introductory physics course for physics, mathematics, chemistry, and engineering majors. In it, students will cover the foundations of classical mechanics, including linear and vector motion, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, static equilibrium, and waves. Note: Biology majors should take PHYS 1145. 
Corequisite: PHYS 1171L; Prerequisite: MATH 1141 or MATH 1171 (concurrency allowed).
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu  to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

General Physics I Lab
PHYS 1171L (01) (CRN 51521) (1 credit)
5/21/24 – 6/20/24 Tues. and Thurs., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ON CAMPUS
Professors:
Joachim Kuhn and Angela Biselli
$120 Science Lab Fee
This lab course engages students in experimental measurements spanning the areas of mechanics and thermal stresses on matter, with the objective of training students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation, providing depth to students' understanding of the phenomena taught in PHYS 1171. Specific experimental measurements include accelerated motion, periodic motion, gravitational force, ballistics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational dynamics. Students complete a weekly lab report. Corequisite: PHYS 1171
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

 

Introduction to American Politics
POLI 1101 (01) (CRN 51070) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Gwendoline Alphonso
This course section fulfills a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement.
A central purpose of this two-week online course is to introduce and explore the politics and workings of American governance. The stakes for the study of American politics have never been higher. As political polarization intensifies, now at levels not experienced since the American Civil War, and the political environment is saturated by negative partisanship, rancor and disinformation; it is only by developing a thorough, systematic, evidence-based understanding of American politics that we can form informed perspectives, understand the views of others, and identify our own role in sustaining American democracy. Through the course we will focus on “big ideas” and adopt a “political development” perspective, understanding contemporary American politics as part of the evolution of American political ideas, institutions, and interests. We will explore both foundational and historical trends, watershed events, as well as breaking and contemporary national political developments related to presidential and congressional elections, and important social and economic policies, such as abortion, marijuana, immigration, voting. Attributes: Politics Major American Politics (PMAP), American Studies Gateway Course. Satisfies “social science” requirement in the Magis Core, and Social Justice 1 Requirement in the Magis Core.

United States Foreign Policy
POLI 2476 (01) (CRN 51071) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Lucrecia Garcia Iommi
This course section fulfills a MWAC Signature Element requirement. 
How is foreign policy made in the United States? This course examines the impact of domestic and international actors and processes in the formation and conduct of United States foreign policy. It also provides a historical background on the basis of which it analyzes contemporary United States economic foreign policy, security foreign policy, environmental and energy foreign policy, and the promotion of democracy and human rights in different regions of the world, including Asia, Latin America, Western Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

Lifespan Development
PSYC 1110 (01) (CRN 51514) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Jeanne Peloso
The course encompasses a developmental psychology approach to the growth of the individual from birth to old age, tracing motor, perceptual, language, cognitive, and emotional growth and emphasizing normal development. Psychology majors and students who have taken PSYC 2110 or PSYC 2150 may not take this course.

Common Questions, Traditional Responses
RLST 1002 (3 credits)
Three sections -  All ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
RLST 1002 (01) (CRN 51076) 5/20/24 – 6/28/24
RLST 1002 (02) (CRN 51077) 5/20/24 – 6/28/24
RLST 1002 (03) (CRN 51633) 5/20/24 - 6/28/24

Professor: John Slotemaker
All three course sections fulfill MSJ1 and MWAC Signature Element requirements.
This course examines the major questions addressed by most world religions, with special emphasis on how they are answered in a specific major tradition. Topics include the nature of the sacred and its relationship to human persons, the problem of evil and innocent suffering, religion's call for social responsibility, and the nature and function of ritual.

Early Christianity
RLST 2428 (3 credits)
Three sections – All ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
RLST 2428 (01) (CRN 51079) 5/20/24 – 6/28/24
RLST 2428 (02) (CRN 51445) 5/20/24 – 6/28/24
RLST 2428 (03) (CRN 51634) 5/20/24 - 6/28/24

Professor: Thomas Schmidt
All three course sections fulfill MSJ2 and MWAC Signature Element requirements.
This course presents a historical overview of early Christianity between the end of the first century and the close of the sixth. The focus of the course is on the institutional and theological development of the early Church after the final books of the New Testament were written. Topics examined include: Jesus and Judaism, Christianity and the Roman Empire, heresies of the Early Church, and the development of Christian theology (in particular the doctrines of Christ and the Trinity).
Prerequisite: One 1000-level religious studies course.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Special Topics: Religious Ethics and Speculative Fiction
RLST 2900 (01) (CRN 51494) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 ONLINE in asynchronous and synchronous sessions. Synchronous Zoom sessions to be determined by class agreement.
Professor: Sara Williams
This course uses various frameworks in religious ethics to examine social issues as they are represented in science fiction, fantasy, magical. realism, and other speculative fiction genres. Students will explore issues such as climate change, racism, gentrification, and emerging technologies as they are portrayed in fictional worlds to spark their religious and moral imaginations in regard to the ethics of these issues in our own world.
Prerequisite: One 1000-level religious studies course.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Criminal Justice System Seminar
Course will be held both Online and On-Campus
ONLINE: SOCI 2220 (01) (CRN 51216) (3 credits)
ON-CAMPUS: SOCI 2220 (03) (CRN 51631) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 5/31/24 Mon.-Fri., 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Professor: Rose Rodrigues
This seminar explores in detail the workings and problems of the criminal justice system in the United States. In addition to investigating the sources of criminal behavior, the course focuses on the arraignment process, probation, the trial, sentencing, prison reform, and parole.

Digital Tools in Art Making
SART 1101 (01) (CRN ) (3 credits)
5/20/24 – 6/28/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Tonya Lee
$120 Materials Fee
In this introductory studio course, students will explore digital graphics software and how it may be used in conjunction with traditional art media (such as painting and drawing in pencil, ink, charcoal, pastels, and gouache) to develop a unique visual voice. Through projects that build on one another's idea-based and technical components, students will develop an understanding of vocabulary fundamental to visual language and technology's relationship to art now and throughout history. Projects will emphasize that digital technology is not an end in itself, but a means to realizing ideas.

Two-Week July Online Courses

This two-week intensive online course will run from Monday, July 8, 2024 to Friday, July 19, 2024 and may require advance preparation prior to the start of class. Students who register for this course will be emailed a syllabus to their student Gmail account.

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 3, 2024.

History and Development of Rock
MUSC 1102 (01) (CRN 51168) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 7/19/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Brian Torff
This course section fulfills a MSJR Signature Element requirement. This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course surveys the musical and social trends that resulted in the emergence of rock and roll as an important musical and cultural force in America. The course traces the roots of rock, blues, and country styles, showing how they merged with popular music. Students examine periods from the 1950s to the present, along with Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, the Beatles, the British invasion, folk music, Bob Dylan, jazz and art rock, Jimi Hendrix, the west coast movement, and the music industry. Students learn to understand, discuss, and differentiate between stylistic periods and their historical relevance to American culture. 

Summer Session II: July/August Courses

Intermediate Accounting II
ACCT 2204 (01) (CRN 51045) (3 credits) 
7/9-24 – 8/8/24 Tues./Wed./Thurs. 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. ONLINE
Professor: Scott Brenner
This course continues the in-depth study of financial accounting theory and concepts, and the presentation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) begun in ACCT 2203. In addition to balance sheet valuation and income measurement issues, the course includes special topics such as earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, leases, and cash flows.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2203
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1110 (01) (CRN 51072) (3 credits) 
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Sarah Wessler
This course meets the world diversity requirement.
Why is there such variety in the way people live, dress, speak, eat, love and fight? This course explores the shared patterns of thought, behavior, and feelings - that is, the cultures - of a number of peoples and presents explanations for the forms they take and the differences between them. The course helps students develop a new perspective on the values and institutions of Western culture.

Biomedical Anthropology
ANTH 1210 (01) (CRN 51489)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Gary Aronsen
This seminar-style class explores biological anthropology to examine the dynamic relationship between health, biology, and culture. Across cultures, geography, and time, we uncover the underlying processes that inhibit or enhance human health. From the biology of stress to the eradication of tuberculosis and Ebola, we'll see biological anthropology's invaluable contributions to modern medicine, public health, and global health management. Students will learn theoretical and applied approaches to understand the evolution and ecology of disease; human development and metabolism; and sexuality and gender; as well as health policy and medical practice (in terms of cultural universals, differences, and disparities). This course meets the core natural science requirement and not the social science requirement.

Ethics of War and Peace
AETH 2293 (01) (CRN 51044) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Norma Schmidt
This course section fulfills a MSJ2 Signature Element requirement.
This course is a survey of issues relating to war and international conflict. Topics include Just War theory, human rights issues, the impact of war on women, the role of the United Nations Security Council, and the history of global attempts to proscribe and prevent aggression. The course also looks at related issues that have emerged in recent years, such as humanitarian intervention and economic sanctions. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Environmental Science
BIOL 1076 (02) (CRN 51355) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: James Biardi
This course fulfills a MSID Signature Element requirement.

The science of the environment is presented through examination of the interconnections among physical, chemical, and biological fields of inquiry. This course looks at how the global environment is altered by the human population, technology, and production of fuels and food. In this course, students will acquire a scientific understanding of current issues in environmental science and learn to evaluate claims about current environmental problems. Note: This course counts as a natural science core but does not satisfy requirements for the biology or chemistry major or minor.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
BIOL 1108 lecture (01) (CRN 51051) (4 credits) Corequisite: BIOL 1108L
7/8/24 – 8/8/24
Mon./Wed., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. ONLINE
Tues./Thurs., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. ON CAMPUS
BIOL 1108L lab (01) (CRN 51052) (0 credits)
7/9/24 – 8/8/24 Tues./Thurs., 10:05 a.m. to 12:55 p.m. ON CAMPUS
Professor: Anthony DeCristofaro
$120 Science Lab Fee
This course is required for nursing majors as a prerequisite for most nursing courses. A strong chemistry background is recommended. Homeostasis is the major theme of the course with form and function covered together each semester. This course continues with the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems.  Laboratory work closely follows the BIOL 1108 lecture and includes microscopic anatomy (histology), use of virtual cadaver (Anatomage Table), anatomical models, and dissections for study of gross anatomy, and physiology experiments including blood pressure measurements, blood typing, lung function, and urinalysis. Note: This course is not open to biology majors except where required for allied health sciences (chair approval required). Prerequisite: BIOL 1107
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Messaging and Persuasion: Effective Business Communication
BUSN 1101 (01) (CRN 51205) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: LoriBeth Greenan
This course section fulfills a MWID Signature Element requirement. 
This course is designed to immerse students in the use of various platforms through which to communicate. At times they will make a face-to-face presentation, at other times they will need to craft a convincing and accurate e-mail, and at still other times they will be distilling their analysis of an extensive data set into a clear and comprehensive research report or business document. We will be called upon to deliver difficult messages to peers and superiors, to the media, or to customers. All of these activities require communication skills and also the ability to choose and manage appropriate media platforms. The goal of this course is to provide students with the written, verbal, and non-verbal skills necessary to be effective communicators.

Chemistry of Nutrition
CHEM 1033 (01) (CRN 51357) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Ranya Hamada
This course introduces basic chemical concepts, such as the atom, molecules, chemical reactivity and energy, as well as integrating fundamental biological concepts including cell structure and basic anatomy. Further explored, on a chemical level, are the structure and function of basic nutritional components: proteins, carbohydrate, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. With a scientific foundation established, topics pertaining to nutrition and human evolution, the life cycle, and exercise will be discussed. Current social and health issues such as obesity, food technology, and fad dieting will be incorporated throughout the course. Note: This course counts as a science core course but does not satisfy requirements for the chemistry major or minor. Students may take either CHEM 1033 or CHEM 1072 as a core science requirement, but not both.

Molecules of Life
CHEM 1087 (02) (CRN 51505) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/8/24 Mon.-Thurs., 9 to 11 a.m. This course is both ONLINE synchronous and asynchronous. Class will meet in synchronous online sessions but will also be recorded on Zoom and available in Blackboard so students may listen to the lecture at any time during the day/evening. Professor: Jon Harper
This course explores the modern science of biologically relevant compounds and substances, which exist at the intersection of chemistry, biology, and medicine. We examine the major molecular components of the cell - proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and more - and illustrate the application of chemical principles to understanding their structure and function. Since our lives are increasingly influenced by the availability of new pharmaceutical agents ranging from drugs that lower cholesterol to those that influence behavior, we develop insights needed to understand drug action and consider the design of new ways to intercede in the disease process. Note: This course counts as a science core course but does not satisfy requirements for the chemistry major or minor.

General Chemistry II Lecture and Lab
CHEM 1172 Lecture (01) (CRN 51144) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/9/24 Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. - 10 a.m. HYBRID
ON CAMPUS: Tues., Wed., Thurs. and select Fridays (for exams)
ONLINE: Mon.
Professor: Thomas Castonguay
This course, the second in a two-semester sequence, covers atomic and molecular weights, the mole concept, Avogadro's number, stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the electronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the elements, chemical bonding, geometrics of molecules, molecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and nonmetals, and chemistry of coordination compounds.
Corequisite: CHEM 1172L
Prerequisite: CHEM 1171
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.
CHEM 1172L Lab (01) (CRN 51145) (1 credit) 
7/9/24 – 8/8/24 Tues., Wed. and Thurs. 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Lab is ON CAMPUS 
Professor: Thomas Castonguay
$120 Science Lab Fee
This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and record observations on simple chemical systems while learning fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement skills. Experiments demonstrate and supplement concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester emphasizes weighing, filtering, titrating, using volumetric glassware, observing data, and recording and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates these techniques in experimental procedures and explores physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemical systems.
Corequisite: CHEM 1172
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Organic Chemistry II Lecture and Lab
CHEM 2272 Lecture (01) (CRN 51148) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/9/24 Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. HYBRID
ON CAMPUS: Tues., Wed., Thurs. and select Fridays (for exams)
ONLINE: Mon.
Professor: Mehrnaz Kamal
This course presents the chemistry of aromatic, carbonyl, acyl, and nitrogen compounds. The course relates the chemical properties of naturally occurring substances such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids to those of simpler monofunctional compounds. Spectroscopic methods of structure determination are introduced early in the course and used throughout.
Corequisite: CHEM 2272L. Prerequisite: CHEM 2271
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.
CHEM 2272L Lab (01) (CRN 51149) (1 credit)
7/9/24 – 8/8/24 Tues., Wed. and Thurs., 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. ON CAMPUS 
Professor: Mehrnaz Kamal
$120 Science Lab Fee
This lab emphasizes investigative experiments, more complex synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis.
Corequisite: CHEM 2272
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Mass, Media and Society
COMM 1130 (01) (CRN 51359) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Adam Rugg
This course section fulfills MWAC and MSJ2 Signature Element requirements.
This media literacy course offers theoretical and practical tools to critically analyze media texts, as well as understand different ways in which audiences interact with them. Students will inquire into how the pervasive mediation of human experience through mass communication channels affects almost every aspect of socialization processes and people's symbolic environment. The interplay between structural constraints conveyed in media's messages and humans' capacity to exercise interpretive agency is addressed through lectures, audiovisual examples, hands-on activities, and a variety of assignments aimed at discerning the elements that intervene in the construction and reception of media texts, beyond their apparent components. This course counts in the social and behavioral sciences core curriculum for non-majors.

NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Introduction to Macroeconomics
ECON 1012 (01) (CRN 51055) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: William Vasquez-Mazariegos
This course develops models of the aggregate economy to determine the level of output, income, prices, and unemployment in an economy. In recognition of the growing importance of global economic activity, these models incorporate the international sector. The course examines and evaluates the role of public economic policy, including fiscal and monetary policy. Topics may include growth theory and price stability.

Economics of Race, Class, and Gender in the American Workplace
ECON 2114 (01) (CRN 51204) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Kathryn Nantz
This course section fulfills a MSJR Signature Element requirement and a MWAC Signature Element requirement. This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course examines the impact of race, class, and gender differences on decisions made in households and in the workplace. It begins with an in-depth analysis of labor supply decisions and responsibilities of households, moving to an examination of labor demand decisions and wage-rate determination. The course reviews applications of theoretical predictions as they relate to important public policy issues such as child and elder care, social security, pay equity, the glass ceiling, affirmative action, sexual harassment, and poverty.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
ENGL 1001 (02) (CRN 51151) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Ricardo Friaz
This course introduces students to the academic discipline of rhetoric and composition. Students read nonfiction texts, including rhetoric and composition and cross-disciplinary scholarship, in order to analyze their conventions and craft texts in various genres and modalities for a range of audiences. Students develop effective writing processes, sound research strategies, strong academic arguments, rhetorical awareness, and sensitivity to disciplinarity. The course prepares students to transfer this knowledge to their compositions across the curriculum and across contexts. 

Graphic Novels as Thrillers and Chillers
ENGL 1350 (01) (CRN 51626) (3 credits)
7/8/24 - 8/8/24 ON CAMPUS
Mon.-Thurs from 6 to 8 p.m.
Professor:
 Curtis Ferree 
This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course will introduce students to the idea of graphic novels as literature that deals with serious subjects, ranging from social, political, cultural, to race-based and sexually sensitive issues, in ways that are hyperbolically dramatic and/or humorous. It has a strong digital component and students will be asked to work with and use a range of multi-modal tools such as blogs, Wiki, Twitter, Animoto, and visual story-telling. Students will be trained to grasp the fact the graphic novels often reflect historical events, prominent ideological and socio-cultural attitudes of the time, and span the spectrum from propelling propaganda to mounting a critique

Business Writing
ENGL 1832 (02) (CRN 51491) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Nadia Zamin
This course investigates the demands of business writing, including designing documents that visually display information and invite readers to read either quickly or thoroughly. The course stresses theoretical issues as well as practical skills. Students practice writing skills on a variety of projects including memos, proposals, reports, collaborative writing, and writing as part of the job-hunting process. Learning goals include understanding the purposes of writing in business and industry, writing with a clear sense of audience, becoming familiar with document design and electronic communication, ethical and cross-cultural issues, and reviewing scholarly writing and research in this academic field. 

Filmmaker Studies: Alfred Hitchcock
FTMA 2201 (01) (CRN 51235)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions with once-a-week Zoom meetings for all students, at a time that will be determined to be convenient for everyone.
Professor: Jay Rozgonyi
Widely regarded as one of the most influential figures in the history of cinema, Alfred Hitchcock had a career as a director that spanned more than 50 years and led to his becoming known as the “Master of Suspense.” His unique style of movie making rarely strayed beyond mysteries and thrillers, which allowed him to perfect his art in dozens of now-classic movies. This online course will sample some of Hitchcock’s greatest works, from his earliest days in England in the 1920s and ‘30s, to his move to America just before World War II and his astounding run of near-perfect films in the 1950s and early ‘60s. Among the films studied will be The 39 Steps, Shadow of a Doubt, Notorious, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho.

Introduction to Finance
FNCE 2101 (01) (CRN 51059) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Walter Hlawitschka
$140 DSB Financial Technology Fee
This course provides the building blocks for understanding the role of finance in the domestic and international environments. Specifically, in a qualitative and quantitative manner, this course addresses the three interrelated fields of finance, namely: financial markets, investments, and business finance.
Prerequisite: ACCT 1011, ECON 1011, ECON 1012, MATH 1016 or higher, sophomore standing.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Origins of the Modern World Since 1500
HIST 1100 (02) (CRN 51456) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/8/24 ONLINE in synchronous sessions
Mon.-Thurs. from 1 to 3 p.m.
Professor: Maryam Kamali
The course, which examines the history of Europe and its relationship to the world from the end of the Middle Ages through the 19th century, emphasizes the cultural, social, economic, and political forces and structures that led to the development of commercial and industrial capitalism, and the effects of this development on Europe, the New World, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation; the Transatlantic Slave Trade; European expansion and colonialism; the development of strong nation states; the Enlightenment; the Industrial Revolution and conflicting ideological and political responses; changing social, family, and gender relationships; and the increasing interaction of Europeans and non-Europeans. Critical analysis of primary and secondary sources develops skills in historical methodology that are of great value in many other academic pursuits. Written assignments and class discussions enhance these skills.

Origins of the Modern World Since 1500
HIST 1100 (03) (CRN 51457) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/8/24 ON CAMPUS
Mon.-Thurs. from 10:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.
Professor: Christopher Doyle
The course, which examines the history of Europe and its relationship to the world from the end of the Middle Ages through the 19th century, emphasizes the cultural, social, economic, and political forces and structures that led to the development of commercial and industrial capitalism, and the effects of this development on Europe, the New World, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation; the Transatlantic Slave Trade; European expansion and colonialism; the development of strong nation states; the Enlightenment; the Industrial Revolution and conflicting ideological and political responses; changing social, family, and gender relationships; and the increasing interaction of Europeans and non-Europeans. Critical analysis of primary and secondary sources develops skills in historical methodology that are of great value in many other academic pursuits. Written assignments and class discussions enhance these skills.

People, Places and Global Issues
INTL 1050 (02) (CRN 51501) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Gru Han
Both course sections fulfill a MSID Signature Element requirement and a MSJ1 Signature Element requirement. This course meets the world diversity requirement.
This course introduces students to some of the fundamental concepts of International Studies. Major world regions and selected countries within them are discussed with respect to the people, and their physical, demographic, cultural, political, and economic characteristics. Several concepts and global issues are explored, among which the physical environment, conflict, inequality, global interconnectedness, and the movement of goods and people across borders are central. This course will emphasize contemporary events, particularly as they relate to the fundamental themes covered.

Introduction to International Business
INTL 2101 (02) (CRN 51354) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Helena Keefe
This course section fulfills a MSJ2 Signature Element requirement.
The main goal of this course is to introduce students to the core concepts, topics, and issues facing businesses operating in the global market today. Students will learn about the changing business environment, international institutions, issues related to international trade and trade agreements, international financial system and exchange rates, global production and supply chain management, and global marketing. Through the study of these topics in international business, students will learn about how the global economy functions and the challenges and opportunities multinational corporations face in working with international organizations, local governments, businesses and consumers, and global competitors.

Digital Marketing
MKTG 2241 (01) (CRN 51065) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Camelia Micu
In this course, students will undertake an applied perspective towards marketing on current digital platforms (company's website, social media platforms, etc.) and will learn how to adapt the traditional marketing strategies onto the digital space. Topics to be covered include website design, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), online advertising, social media marketing, email marketing, mobile marketing, and web analytics. The course is designed to get students to think like a digital marketing professional, and to give them experience with industry-relevant hands-on assignments and exercises.
Prerequisites: MK 1101; junior standing.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Precalculus
MATH 1011 (01) (CRN 51432)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Lisa Russo
Topics in this course include: algebra; linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions from a descriptive, algebraic, numerical and graphical point of view; limits and continuity. Primary emphasis is on techniques needed for calculus. This course does not count toward the mathematics core requirement, and is meant to be taken only by students who are required to take MATH 1121, MATH 1141, or MATH 1171 for their majors, but who do not have a strong enough mathematics background.

Applied Calculus I
Two Sections:
MATH 1121 (02) (CRN 51511) (3 credits) 
MATH 1121 (03) (CRN 51644) (3 credits)
7/8/24 - 8/16/24
Both sections ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Anna DiCenso
Topics in this course include: foundations of the calculus; differentiation of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; extrema and curve sketching; applications of derivatives; antiderivatives; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and integration of algebraic functions. A graphing calculator and Wolfram Alpha are among the technologies that may be used.
Students who received credit for MATH 1141 or MATH 1171 may not take this course for credit.
Prerequisite: Precalculus 
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

Statistics I
MATH 2217 (02) (CRN 51636) (3 credits)
7/8/24 - 8/8/24 ONLINE 
The first week, from 7/8/24 to 7/14/24, the course will run in an asynchronous online format.
Starting 7/15/24, the course will meet in a synchronous online format, Monday through Thursday each week from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Professor: Michael Herley
This introductory, calculus-based statistics course focuses on applications in business, statistics, and everyday events. Topics include descriptive statistics including mean, median, mode, standard deviation, histograms, distributions, box plots, and scatter plots; probability theory including counting rules, random variables, probability distributions, expected values, binomial and normal distributions, and the central limit theorem; inferential statistics including point estimates, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing; and regression theory. Students learn to analyze data with the aid of common software packages. Mathematics majors may not take this course as a mathematics elective. Students who have received credit for MATH 3317 or MATH 3352 may not take this course for credit. 
Prerequisites: MATH 1121 or MATH 1122 or MATH 1141 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1172
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

History and Development of Rock
MUSC 1102 (01) (CRN 51168) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 7/19/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Brian Torff
This course section fulfills a MSJR Signature Element requirement. This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course surveys the musical and social trends that resulted in the emergence of rock and roll as an important musical and cultural force in America. The course traces the roots of rock, blues, and country styles, showing how they merged with popular music. Students examine periods from the 1950s to the present, along with Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, the Beatles, the British invasion, folk music, Bob Dylan, jazz and art rock, Jimi Hendrix, the west coast movement, and the music industry. Students learn to understand, discuss, and differentiate between stylistic periods and their historical relevance to American culture. 

Critical Issues in American Popular Music: Blues to Hip Hop
MUSC 1132 (02) (CRN 51251) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Brian Torff
This course section fulfills a MSJR Signature Element requirement. This course meets the U.S. Diversity requirement.
This course provides an in-depth look at the important musical, social, and racial issues in American popular music, from the media exploitation of the blues in the 1920s through current issues in hip hop. Subject areas will include blues and its origins, jazz and modernism, the obstacles of race in music, the death of rhythm and blues, rock's evolution in the 1950s, rap and hip hop culture, and issues in both postmodernism and perverse as seen by many music and art critics. 

Ancient Philosophy
PHIL 2200 (01) (CRN 51181) (3 credits)
7/8/24 – 8/8/24 Mon.-Thurs., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ONLINE
Professor: Daniel Davenport
In this course we will investigate how the earliest practitioners of Western philosophy conceived of their own activity. The word philosophy' stems from two ancient Greek words and means, literally, 'love of wisdom.' A lover of wisdom is one who pursues wisdom rather than possesses it; consequently, we can think of ancient philosophers as founding a history of inquiry into questions whose relevance for human beings ensures their persistence, questions like: What is the nature of the universe? What can be known? and What in any given situation is the right thing to do? Prerequisite: PHIL 1101
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

General Physics II
PHYS 1172 (01) (CRN 51522) (3 credits)

7/8/24 – 8/8/24 Mon.-Thurs., 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Mon. and Wed. ONLINE 8 to 10 a.m.
Tues. and Thurs. ON CAMPUS 8 to 10 a.m.
Professor: TBA
This course is a continuation of PHYS 1171 and covers electricity and magnetism, light, and optics. Topics covered include electric fields and their sources, magnetic fields and their sources, simple electric circuits, wave motion, reflection and refraction of light, and geometrical optics. Note: Biology majors should take PHYS 1146. 
Corequisite: PHYS 1172L;
Prerequisites: MATH 1142 or MATH 1172 (concurrency allowed); PHYS 1171.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

General Physics II Lab
PHYS 1172L (01) (CRN 51523) (1 credit)
7/9/24 – 8/8/24, Tues. and Thurs., 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ON CAMPUS
Professor: TBA
$120 Science Lab Fee
This laboratory provides students with a greater understanding of electromagnetic phenomena, wave phenomena, and optics, and supports PHYS 1172. Measurements of microscopic quantities, like the charge and mass of the electron, give students an opportunity to explore the structure of matter. Other experiments involve the physics of electrical currents, electric properties of bulk matter, magnetic fields and their effect on beams, wave phenomena, and the nature of light and its interaction with optical materials. This course trains students in experimental measurements, data analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation. Students complete a weekly lab report. Corequisite: PHYS 1172.
NOTE TO VISITING STUDENTS: Please email summerstudies@fairfield.edu to obtain permission to register for this course from the Fairfield University Office of the Provost.

American Public Policy
POLI 2109 (01) (CRN 51530)
7/8/24 – 8/16/24
Professor: Gayle Alberda
This course section fulfills a MSJ2 Signature Element requirement and a MWAC Signature Element requirement.
Public policy results from complex interactions between political actors, elected officials, bureaucrats, interest groups, political activists, corporations, citizens, the media, and governing structures and rules. The policy making process is the lifeblood of the American political system. This course explores current policy debates, key models and theories that seek to explain public policy, and the significant role politics plays in the policy making process. Students will learn how public policies are formulated, understand current tools and techniques used in making policy, and gain the ability to assess policy options.

Lifespan Development
TWO SECTIONS:
PSYC 1110 (02) (CRN 51545) (3 credits)
PSYC 1110 (03)  (CRN 51648) (3 credits)
7/8/24 - 8/16/24 BOTH SECTIONS ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Jeanne Peloso
The course encompasses a developmental psychology approach to the growth of the individual from birth to old age, tracing motor, perceptual, language, cognitive, and emotional growth and emphasizing normal development. Psychology majors and students who have taken PSYC 2110 or PSYC 2150 may not take this course.

The Problem of God
RLST 2331 (01) (CRN 51513) (3 credits)
7/8/24 - 8/16/24 ONLINE in asynchronous sessions
Professor: Erik Ranstrom
This historical and theological examination of the Christian doctrine of God pays special attention to the problematic aspects of the development of this doctrine through the ages, exploring this development in biblical sources; patristic, medieval, Reformation, and modern times. The course concludes with a consideration of the challenge of post-Enlightenment atheism and of the efforts of contemporary theologians to recast the classical conception of God.
Prerequisite: One 1000-level religious studies course.

Engineering

ELEG 4315 (01) (CRN 51509) (3 credits)
5/20/24 - 8/16/24 ONLINE
Professor: Isaac Macwan
Building on the two introductory courses in nanotechnology, this course is the first of two that describe how nanotechnology can be integrated into the electronics industry. The unique electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of structures in the nanometer range and how they may be applied to electronics products are discussed. Principles of electronic materials, semiconductor devices, and microfabrication techniques will be extended to the nanoscale. Students will increase their knowledge of electronic structure, quantum mechanics, and the behavior of optoelectronic and low-dimensional systems. Students make extensive use of the available literature to seek out potential applications of nanotechnology. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology/nanoelectronics track. Graduate equivalent: ECEG 5315. 
MEEG 4324 (01) (CRN 51206) (3 credits)
5/20/24 - 8/16/24 ONLINE
Professor: Sriharsha Srinivas Sundarram
This course will introduce students to the latest advancements in micro and nano manufacturing. The course will enable students to become familiar with advanced manufacturing techniques in light of the global emphasis on micro and nano manufacturing. Topics to be covered include lithography, mechanical micromachining, laser fabrication, polymers and nanocomposites, and nano imprinting. The important topics of metrology and process control at the micro and nano scale will also be discussed. Students will conduct a class project integrating the different processes for an application in electromechanical or biomedical field. A lab component is also present where students get a hands-on experience with material processing and characterization tools.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1171, MEEG 2207, PHYS 1171, Senior Standing.
Graduate equivalent: MEEG 5324. 
MEEG 4362 (01) (CRN 51207) (3 credits)
5/20/24 - 8/16/24 ONLINE
Professor: Shahrokh Etemad
The theoretical basis and the fundamentals of modern turbomachinery for aerospace (helicopter, aircraft) and power generation (marine, industrial) applications are studied. Brayton engine cycle analysis and performance improvement are reviewed. Applications of the principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the design of turbines and compressors are examined, as well as component analysis and velocity diagram for axial compressors, centrifugal compressors and axial turbines. Discussion of combustion and environmental emissions. This course carries a design/research project.
Prerequisite: MEEG 3347. Graduate equivalent: MEEG 5362.

Summer Internships

Communication Internship: Summer 2024 semester
COMM 4980 (01) (CRN 51110) – 1 credit
COMM 4980 (03) (CRN 51330) – 3 credits
5/20/24 – 8/16/24
Contact Dr. Qin Zhang for details at qzhang@fairfield.edu.
Communication internships provide students with first-hand knowledge about the field of work, allow them to experience new professional activities and relationships, help them apply conceptual knowledge and skills in communication in the work environment, and allow them to experience the problems and successes of efficiently and effectively communicating within a complex organization. One three-credit internship course can be used toward the major. Students may take an internship twice for credit. Students must have a GPA of 2.8 or higher. Enrollment by permission only.
Prerequisites: Junior standing; One to three credits per semester; six-credit limit.

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