Student Handbook |Student Conduct Code 

Student Conduct Code

INTRODUCTION

As a Jesuit and Catholic university, Fairfield has a distinctive mission. The University focuses not only on excellence in teaching, learning, and scholarship, but also on growth and development of the whole person. We value life outside the classroom as essential to the educational mission to foster not only individual growth, but spiritual, moral, and social growth as well. Our community holds high expectations of how we live and interact with one another, as the successes and failures of each member of our community shape Fairfield. Respect for self and respect for others, both within and outside the University community, lie at the heart of our standards of conduct. Students are held accountable for their actions as a necessary part of our community life.

Because we are a community committed to Jesuit and Catholic ideals and to the growth of each individual, the standards established for members of the Fairfield community are not always exactly the same as those within society at large. The University's Student Conduct Code goes beyond what is simply required for public order. The Code incorporates what is good and developmental for the individual and for the University community.

At times, the process of calling students to accountability can be very difficult. This is particularly the case on those occasions when the conduct in question is so contrary to our community standards as to warrant restriction from University activities or dismissal from the University. However, even in these most difficult situations, the University seeks first and foremost to serve its students in an educative role. Because education is our primary purpose, procedures in University the student conduct process are not the same as due process in the criminal or civil courts.

The Student Conduct Code applies to behavior both on and off campus. In the event of a discrepancy between the information contained in this section of the Handbook and another University publication or document, the terms of this section of the Handbook will apply. Fairfield University reserves the right to withhold issuance of a diploma, regardless of degree requirement completion, where a violation of this code, the law, and/or our policies on academic dishonesty is implicated.

Office of the Dean of Students

The Office of the Dean of Students has ultimate responsibility for enforcing University policies and the Student Conduct Code. The dean delegates to the associate dean of students and his or her staff the responsibility of administering the student conduct process on a daily basis. The dean may also delegate student conduct process duties to the Office of Residence Life to carry out those functions within the residence halls under a structure that employs use of its administrative staff, Peer Conduct Board representatives, and/or designated students.

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

Aiding, Abetting, or Complicity

Alcohol Policy

Arson, Fire Alarms, and Emergency Equipment

Communication with University Personnel

Compliance with Requests or Directives

Damage to Property/Vandalism

Dining Hall

Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct

Drug Policy

Gambling

Guest Policy

Harassment

Hazing

Indecent Conduct

Internet Communications

Misrepresentation or False Information

Off-Campus Misconduct

Physical Violence, Threat of Force, Bodily Harm, and Fighting

Recreational Transportation Equipment

Right to Privacy

Sexual Misconduct

Solicitation

Smoking

Study Abroad

Theft

Unauthorized Entry

Weapons, Knives, Firearms, Fireworks, and Projectiles

STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS

Incident Report

Hearing

Boards

Peer Mediation

Stag Explorers

Restorative Mentoring

Appeals

Student Rights

Student Conduct Records

Sanctions

State and Federal Alcohol and Drug Laws

Finding Help with Regard to Alcohol, Drugs, Eating Disorders, or Gambling

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

Aiding, Abetting, or Complicity

Helping or encouraging another person to engage in violations of University policy constitutes aiding and abetting. Witnessing policy violations and failing to report such inappropriate behavior constitutes complicity.

Alcohol Policy

The University's alcohol policies reflect the laws of the State of Connecticut regarding the purchase, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages. No one under the age of 21 is permitted to purchase, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages. Those who are 21 years of age or older may purchase and consume alcohol; however, it is not permissible for any University student to serve, possess, or consume pure grain alcohol. All students are responsible for discouraging alcohol-related behavior that is abusive to themselves or to others, or disruptive to the community. Moreover, drunkenness and intoxication are prohibited regardless of age.

If alcohol is served at a gathering, it is the responsibility of the host to comply with state and local laws. A social host may be held responsible for injuries and damages caused by a minor who is served alcohol. A host may be liable even if the host is a minor. Therefore, if alcohol is served at a gathering, the host must ensure that minors are not served. Furthermore, it is a violation of state law to sell alcohol without a permit, and individuals who charge for admission to a party where alcohol is served may be held criminally liable. Criminal sanctions may equally apply if the vendor accepts money for cups or ice, instead of explicitly for the alcohol. No student, regardless of age, is permitted to be in possession of kegs, beer balls, common containers over 64 ounces (empty or full), or equivalent quantities of liquor anywhere on campus unless otherwise authorized. No student, regardless of age, is permitted to brew their own beer or make their own wine, cider, or liquor.

Consumption of alcoholic beverages on the grounds of the campus is prohibited unless it has been specifically approved by and registered with the Office of Conference & Event Management. Individuals who appear intoxicated (e.g., unable to walk without assistance, speaking incoherently, emitting a strong odor of alcohol, or vomiting) or who exhibit drunken behavior will not be admitted to campus events. Moreover, individuals demonstrating such behavior while attending any registered social function will be promptly removed.

Residence halls, townhouses, and apartments: Consumption of alcoholic beverages in the residence halls is prohibited in common areas such as hallways, bathrooms, stairwells, kitchens, porches, and lounges.

All campus residences: Large common sources of alcohol, such as kegs, beer balls, common containers over 64 ounces, or equivalent quantities of liquor, are not permitted.

Athletic events: Alcoholic beverages may not be sold, distributed, or consumed at athletic events held on campus. This policy applies to all varsity, club, and recreational events held on campus.

General Guidelines for Alcohol-Related Infractions

The following represents general guidelines that are used by the Office of the Dean of Students when determining sanctions for alcohol-related misconduct. These guidelines will also be utilized by those individuals and offices designated by the Dean of Students (namely, the Office of Residence Life) to carry out the review of cases and determination of sanctions for alcohol-related misconduct. For first-time, minor infractions, and at the discretion of the Office of the Dean of Students, students may be given the option of confirming their responsibility in writing in lieu of a hearing/meeting with the Dean's office. Sanctions will still apply.

The list below is not exclusive, nor does it represent the maximum or minimum action that may be taken to address particular conduct. The fine is per person unless specified per residence.

Possession or consumption of alcohol (not abusive or disruptive in nature) in violation of University policy

First Offense:

  • Formal warning
  • Reflection paper
  • Alcohol education or educational activity
  • $100 fine for incidents involving hard liquor, hosting a gathering with alcohol, or large quantities of alcohol.
  • Letter to parent/guardian

Second Offense:

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • Alcohol education or educational activity
  • $150 fine (maximum). Fine amount will vary depending on the quantity and type of alcoholic beverages consumed or confiscated, with higher fines given for incidents involving hard liquor.
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian
  • Referral to Restorative Mentoring

Third Offense:

  • Disciplinary probation and/or dismissal
  • Referral for evaluation (and possible required stipulations)
  • $200 fine (maximum). Fine amount will vary depending on the quantity and type of alcoholic beverages consumed or confiscated, with higher fines given for incidents involving hard liquor.
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian

Fourth Offense:

  • Dismissal

Illegal or unauthorized distribution of alcohol to underage students

First Offense:

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • Alcohol education or educational activity
  • $200 fine (maximum)
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian
  • Referral to Restorative Mentoring

Second Offense:

  • Disciplinary probation and/or dismissal
  • $400 fine (maximum)
  • Community service
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian

An additional $100 fine can be given per house for hosting a disruptive gathering with alcohol involving underage students. Additional offenses will jeopardize a student's status at the University.

Alcohol impairment/abusive use violations (e.g., driving under the influence of alcohol, disruptive or violent behavior, drunkenness, intoxication, or use of grain alcohol)

First Offense:

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • Alcohol education or educational activity
  • $200 fine (maximum)
  • Referral for evaluation (and possible required stipulations)
  • Community service
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian
  • Referral to Restorative Mentoring

Second Offense:

  • Disciplinary probation or dismissal
  • Alcohol education or educational activity
  • $400 fine (maximum)
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Meeting with student and parent/guardian to discuss the matter

Additional offenses will jeopardize a student's status at the University.

Possession or use of a keg or other large, common source of alcohol

First Offense:

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • $500 fine per keg (maximum) per residence
  • Alcohol education or educational activity
  • Community service
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian
  • Referral to Restorative Mentoring

Second Offense:

  • Disciplinary probation
  • $700 fine per keg (maximum) per residence
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Meeting with student and parent/guardian to discuss the matter

Additional offenses will jeopardize a student's status at the University.

The University accepts the responsible and legal use and consumption of alcohol by students over the age of 21, but rejects its illegal use or abusive consumption. Accordingly, behaviors such as drinking games which may contribute to or facilitate the potentially dangerous or inappropriate consumption of alcohol are strongly discouraged and may be taken into consideration when determining sanctions for alcohol-related misconduct. Moreover, drunkenness and intoxication are impermissible and unacceptable, regardless of one's age.

Consistent with this policy, excessive amounts of alcohol, as well as kegs, beer balls, or other common containers (empty or full), are not allowed in any residence on campus. In addition, students can be found responsible for violating this policy if they are attending a gathering with alcohol and are not over the age of 21.

Arson, Fire Alarms, and Emergency Equipment

The deliberate setting of a fire on University property is a very serious offense and will result in removal from housing and/or dismissal from the University.

Tampering with firefighting equipment (e.g., fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, heat sensors, etc.), reporting bomb scares, or setting off false fire and emergency alarms may endanger lives and are serious violations of state and federal laws, as well as University regulations. Heat and/or smoke detectors, as well as sprinkler heads, are extremely sensitive and may be activated by any contact. Therefore, students should not touch these devices or hang objects from them. Violations of this policy will result in sanctions, including but not limited to dismissal or expulsion from the University and restitution for any damage caused to university property and/or personal property of any individual(s) affected.

Failure to leave a building in the event of a fire alarm is serious and may endanger a student's life or the lives of others.

Communication with University Personnel

Students are expected to be respectful of faculty and staff. This includes, but is not limited to, members of the Residence Life staff, custodial staff, dining services staff, maintenance/grounds staff, faculty, support staff, and University administrators. Any form of inappropriate communication, gesture or action (e.g., pushing, intimidating or threatening words, etc.) is prohibited.  Moreover, verbal or written exchanges that are not in accordance with University ideals will be considered violations of the Student Conduct Code.

Compliance with Requests or Directives

Students are required to comply with reasonable requests, directives, or orders by authorized University personnel (e.g., residence life staff, public safety officers, etc.). This requirement includes, but is not limited to, reasonable requests for students to meet appointments in administrative or faculty offices and to be cooperative during investigations and hearings. It also includes properly identifying oneself upon request.

Damage to Property/Vandalism

The University expects students to respect personal and University property both inside and outside of the community. Damage shall be classified as either accidental or malicious. Accidental damage is damage occurring through unintentional, chance happenings. Vandalism is deliberate, malicious, and/or disruptive behavior resulting in damage to property.

All types of damage caused to any student residence or its furnishings are the responsibility of the students assigned to that residence, and repair costs will be billed accordingly. Damage that occurs in common areas of student residences (e.g., hallways, common bathrooms, backyards, etc.) will be divided and shared among all residents of that particular residence hall, floor, or block.

In addition to the replacement or repair cost resulting from such behavior, additional sanctions will be levied, up to and including dismissal or expulsion and possible arrest and prosecution by state or federal authorities for cases of intentional damage and vandalism.

Accidental or unintentional damage to property is inevitable and unavoidable at times. When it occurs, it will be recognized as such and the responsible individual will be billed simply for the replacement or repair cost. The University will collect and expect payment from students for damage done to University property. The University shall complete the repairs and expect payment from students for the repairs within 30 days. Students are not permitted to attempt to fix the damage themselves or contract with an outside vendor for repairs.

The University does not reimburse students for personal property damage or loss. The University will assist, but does not assume responsibility for, collecting payment on behalf of a student for damage done to the personal property of that student by another student.

Additional sanctions for vandalism/damage to property:

Damage

First Offense:

  • Formal warning 
  • Restitution
  • Community service or educational activity

Second Offense: 

  • Formal warning 
  • Restitution
  • Loss of guest privileges 
  • Community service or educational activity
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)

Third Offense:

  • Disciplinary probation
  • Restitution
  • Loss of guest privileges 
  • Community service or educational activity
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Restorative mentoring and/or mandated assessment with Counseling and Psychological Services


Vandalism

First Offense:

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • Restitution
  • $150 fine (maximum)
  • Loss of guest privileges
  • Community service
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Restorative mentoring and/or mandated assessment with Counseling and Psychological Services

Second Offense: 

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • Restitution
  • $300 fine (maximum)
  • Loss of guest privileges
  • Community service
  • Removal from housing
  • Restorative mentoring and/or mandated assessment with Counseling and Psychological Services

 Third Offense: 

  • Dismissal from the University

Dining Hall

Failure to abide by dining regulations, including, but not limited to, engaging in food fights, other disruptive or disrespectful behavior, removal of food or utensils, or unauthorized entrance to the dining hall is prohibited. Dining privileges suspended or revoked for conduct or behavioral reasons are not eligible for a refund.

Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct

Disorderly conduct is the unreasonable or reckless behavior by an individual or group that creates a potentially unsafe situation for members of the community or damages property; disrupts the peace or interferes with the normal operation of the University or University sponsored events; and/or infringes on the rights of others. 

Disorderly conduct includes, but is not limited to: reckless driving; interrupting or interfering with the carrying out of the duties of a university or public official, including law enforcement;  and vomiting and/or urinating in public.

Disruptive Conduct is any behavior by  an individual or group that  interferes with the normal operation of the University and the overall educational experience.  It hinders or prevents others and/or self from carrying out their educational responsibilities.

Drug Policy

The possession, use, or distribution of illicit or illegal drugs is strictly forbidden. The possession of drug paraphernalia is also prohibited.  Responsible students are subject to tickets/infractions, arrest and prosecution by state and/or federal authorities.

Distribution is considered to be any form of dispersal or delivery, including the payment for or barter of, illicit or illegal drugs even if the transactions did not involve the exchange of monetary funds.

The improper use of prescription drugs is a serious problem on college campuses. For this reason, it is a violation of the Student Conduct Code for a student to be in possession of another person's prescription medication, medication for which they do not have a prescription or for a student to provide a prescribed drug to another person.

General Guidelines for Drug-Related Infractions

The list below is not exclusive, nor does it represent the maximum or minimum action that may be taken to address particular conduct. The fine is per person unless specified per residence.

Possession/Use of drugs/Possession of drug paraphernalia

Simple Offense:

  • Formal warning or disciplinary probation
  • Drug education and/or substance abuse assessment
  • $300 fine (maximum)
  • Community service and/or educational project
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian

Major Offense:

  • Disciplinary probation, dismissal, or expulsion
  • Drug education and/or substance abuse assessment
  • $300 fine (maximum)
  • Restorative Mentoring and/or mandated assessment with Counseling and Psychological Service
  • Loss of housing privilege(s) (e.g., lottery participation, housing restriction, change of housing assignment, removal from housing)
  • Letter to parent/guardian

Distribution of or Intent to Distribute Drugs/Sale of or Intent to Sell Drugs

First Offense:

  • Dismissal or expulsion

(Updated 1/16/2018)

Gambling

Illegal gambling is prohibited.

Guest Policy

All undergraduate students are required to register guests on campus via the guest registration form. Students are only permitted two registered guests at any time and all guests must be registered 24 hours in advance. Students are expected to greet their guests upon arrival to campus, be with them/know their whereabouts during their stay, and be present at their departure from campus. Also, guests must carry a printed copy of the guest registration form and valid photo identification at all times and must present such form and identification upon request. Guests may not remain on campus for more than two (2) days. Special exceptions may be granted with the approval of the student's Area Coordinator. Guests attending University events are subject to event policies. Please refer to the Public Attendance section found in Clubs and Organizations for specific details about guest registration at public events.

A resident may neither request nor require his/her roommate(s) to leave the room for a guest(s). A resident must seek approval from all roommate(s)/ housemate(s) for each occurrence involving overnight guest(s).The University reserves the right to limit the frequency of guest(s) visits within a given period of time and expects students to make appropriate arrangements for overnight guest(s).

Students are responsible for the conduct of their guests and for ensuring that visitors adhere to University rules and regulations. Furthermore, students who invite or allow non-students to come on to University property assume all responsibility for any actions, damages, or injuries resulting from the behavior of the guest. Guests found unaccompanied are subject to immediate removal from campus. If guests violate University rules and regulations, the student host or hosts will be held accountable for their actions, and the guests may be removed from campus and may receive a criminal trespass warning.

Full-time undergraduate commuter students are allowed in residential buildings if invited by a resident, or for academic reasons. After 11 p.m., only residents of the buildings are allowed within the residential buildings, unless accompanied by a resident from within the community.

 Violations of the guest policy may result in a minimum fine of $100, loss of guest privileges, and community service.

Harassment

See the Non-Discrimination and Harassment policy in the "Policies and Procedures" section of this Handbook.

 

Hazing

Fairfield University makes every effort to create an environment that is fair, humane and respectful for all students, faculty and staff. The only appropriate manner in which to assimilate members into the Fairfield University community is to welcome them. The hazing policy is intended to guide the community on the University process to complaints of hazing, the resources available to individuals affected by hazing and hazing prevention initiatives. The Hazing Policy applies to all students, and all students are responsible for being familiar with and abiding by the Hazing Policy at all times.

 I.      Definitions

Consistent with Connecticut state law, hazing is prohibited at Fairfield University. Hazing refers to any activity expected of someone joining a group (or to maintain full status in a group) that humiliates, degrades, or risks emotional and/or physical harm, regardless of the person's willingness to participate. Hazing is a complex social problem that is shaped by power dynamics operating in a group and/or organization and within a particular cultural context.

Hazing activities are generally considered to be physically abusive, hazardous, and/or sexually violating. The specific behaviors or activities within these categories vary widely among participants, groups, and settings. While alcohol use is common in many types of hazing, other examples of hazing practices include, but are not limited to, personal servitude; sleep deprivation and restrictions on personal hygiene; yelling, swearing, and insulting members; being forced to wear embarrassing or humiliating attire in public; consumption of vile substances or smearing of such on one's skin; brandings; physical beatings; binge drinking and drinking games; sexual simulation and sexual assault.

For such activities to be considered hazing, forced or mandated participation is not required. If an individual feels that he or she will not be considered a fully participating member of the group or feels that he/she would be ostracized for not participating in particular behaviors (for example, alcohol use), then such implied coercion would be considered hazing. The following are examples of hazing:

  1. Subtle Hazing: Behaviors that emphasize a power imbalance between members of the group or team are termed "subtle hazing" because these types of hazing are often taken-for-granted or accepted as "harmless" or meaningless. Subtle hazing typically involves activities or attitudes that breach reasonable standards of mutual respect and place members on the receiving end of ridicule, embarrassment, and/or humiliation tactics. Members often feel the need to endure subtle hazing to feel like part of the group or team.
  2. Harassment Hazing:  Behaviors that cause emotional anguish or physical discomfort in order to feel like part of the group. Harassment hazing confuses, frustrates, and causes undue stress for members.
  3. Violent hazing: Behaviors that have the potential to cause physical, emotional, and/or psychological harm.

 II.     Reporting a Complaint

A party in immediate danger should get to a safe place and call the Department of Public Safety at (203) 254-4090, or dial 911 for the Fairfield Police Department. Similarly, those in need of medical attention should call the Department of Public Safety or dial 911.

Reporting parties of hazing can file an incident report with the Department of Public Safety at any time. There is no time limit when reporting hazing to the Department of Public Safety. In addition, the following staff members are available to receive reports.

 Jeremy Kaler, Associate Director, Office of Student Engagement

Phone: (203) 254-4000, ext. 2175
E-mail: jkaler@fairfield.edu

 

Thomas Murray, Associate Professor Economics and Faculty Athletics Representative

Phone: (203) 254-4000, ext. 2270
E-mail: tmurray4@fairfield.edu

 

An incident report will include, among other things, the name of the reporting party(s) and the name of the responding party(s), if known. The Department of Public Safety will also determine whether law enforcement or other authorities should be notified.

Direct reporting can be important for the safety of the entire University community. Reporting parties have the right to report hazing to the Department of Public Safety without further participation in the investigatory, hearing, or resolution process. A reporting party can choose to initiate a criminal complaint through law enforcement. Reporting parties should understand, however, that by choosing to not participate in the process, the University's response to the incident may be limited.

Reporting parties of hazing are also encouraged to contact the Fairfield Police Department directly by calling 911. Filing a criminal report with the Fairfield Police Department is different than filing a report with the Department of Public Safety. If an individual files a criminal report with the Fairfield Police Department, the police will determine if a criminal investigation will occur and if the case will be referred for prosecution.

III.  Process of Investigating and Resolving Complaints

 

A. Initial Steps: After receiving a report of conduct that could violate the hazing policy, the Hazing Response Committee (herein, HRC) will gather to review the initial report and determine if any interim measures need to be put in place to address the safety and health needs of all parties and University community.

Interim measures and/or remedies for individual students may include, but are not limited to:

  • No-contact orders;
  • Temporary housing and dining changes;
  • Employment accommodations;
  • Restriction from Athletic or club participation and competition
  • Temporary course changes;
  • Medical and counseling services;
  • Academic support services and accommodations; and
  • Additional training and education.

The HRC consists of officials from the Office of the Dean of Students, Department of Public Safety, Academic Affairs, Department of Counseling/Health Center and the Department of Athletics.

B. Investigation: If it is determined that the reported conduct could violate the Hazing Policy and an investigation is required, the Office of the Dean of Students will prepare a written notice to the reporting party(s) and responding party(s)/organization(s) with the name of the assigned Public Safety officer investigating the case. The assigned officer will meet with all identified parties and potential witnesses for statements and any additional documents or evidence related to the incident. The investigation will be handled in an expeditious manner.

C. Report: At the conclusion of the investigation, the investigating Public Safety officer will submit a final report to the Office of the Dean of Students. If the Office of the Dean of Students determines there might be a violation of the sexual misconduct policy, the Office of the Dean of Students will assign the matter to the Title IX Compliance Coordinator.  If the Office of the Dean of Students determines there is a potential violation of the hazing policy the matter will be assigned to a Student Conduct Board or administrative hearing for adjudication.  The Office of the Dean of Students retains all authority when determining if the matter should be assigned to a Student Conduct Board or administrative hearing for adjudication.

E. Notification of Decision to HRC: Upon reaching a determination of responsibility and sanctions (if applicable), the Office of the Dean of Students will deliver written notification of its decision to the HRC. If the matter involves athletic teams, club sports and/or University sponsored clubs and organizations, the appropriate office and staff members will also be informed of the determination of responsibility and sanctions. Additional sanctions may be issued by other offices if policies related to that specific group have been violated.

F. Standard of Proof:  All findings and determinations of responsibility under the Hazing Policy will be made using a preponderance of the evidence standard.

G. Appeals: Appeals may be made by the reporting or responding party(s) on the basis of newly discovered evidence that was not available at the time of the hearing, or based upon a substantial error in the student conduct proceedings. Severity of the sanction(s) imposed is not grounds for an appeal.

Students may appeal a student conduct outcome within five business days from the date the student is informed of the original decision. The appeal must be submitted in writing to the Vice President of Student Affairs or another designated University official. Students shall be advised in writing of the decision on the appeal within 14 business days. 

An appeal does not postpone the imposition of sanctions. If the appeal is granted, the decision either will be set aside or Vice President of Student Affairs may send the matter back to the appropriate hearing body for further adjudication. The decision of the Vice President of Student Affairs upon appeal is final.

IV. Resources

Fairfield University is committed to the Jesuit understanding of education as a process that involves the transmission of knowledge and the formation of character, both in the classroom and outside of the classroom.  Student organizations and teams recognized by the University can provide students with tremendous opportunities for learning and growth.  However, students should never be subjected to hazing as a condition for seeking to join, holding membership, or affiliating with a student group at Fairfield University.

The University encourages students to make use of appropriate on-campus resources and will assist all persons involved in an allegation of hazing.  Each office is prepared to offer assistance to students both in an emergency and on an on-going basis.  Additionally, students are encouraged to explore the many web resources dedicated to educating the public on hazing.

Confidential Resources On-Campus:                                                                                   

  • Counseling & Psychological Services 
    (203) 254-4000, ext. 2146
  • Student Health Center 
    (203) 254-4000, ext. 2241
  • Jesuit community/Clergy 
    (203) 254-4000, ext. 2664

Private/Non-Confidential Resources On-Campus:                              

  • Public Safety (203) 254-4090
  • Title IX Compliance Coordinator (203) 254-4000, ext. 3329
  • Office of the Dean of Students (203) 254-4211
  • Office of Human Resources (203)254-4000, ext. 2227
  • Campus Ministry (203) 254-4000, ext. 3405
  • Office of Residence Life (203) 254-4215
  • Athletics (203) 254-4000, ext. 3466
  • Club Sports (203) 254-4141
  • Jeremy Kaler, Associate Director, Office of Student Engagement

        Phone: (203) 254-4000, ext. 2175
        E-mail: jkaler@fairfield.edu

  • Thomas Murray, Associate Professor Economics and Faculty Athletics Representative

       Phone: (203) 254-4000, ext. 2270
       E-mail: tmurray4@fairfield.edu

 Off-Campus Resources:                                                                                                      

  • Fairfield Police Department : 911 or (203) 254-4800

Online Resources

 

Indecent Conduct

Public acts of sexual intercourse, exposure of the body with intent to arouse or to satisfy the sexual desire of one's self or another person, or fondling or to caress the body of another person will be considered indecent conduct.

Internet Communications

The Internet provides new and increasingly diverse ways for students to become involved, engaged, and connected as members of the University community. Communications on sites such as Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube, etc., are not specifically monitored by Fairfield University officials, but may be brought to the attention of and considered by the Office of the Dean of Students or its designees when it appears that such communications constitute possible violations of the Student Conduct Code, particularly those policies relating to harassment or discrimination. Messages between individuals including, but not limited to, e-mails, instant messengers, text messaging, and Facebook messages may also be considered in the conduct process. Students should be aware that the Internet is considered a public forum and information posted there can be viewed by anyone.

Misrepresentation or False Information

No student shall knowingly give false information in any University proceeding or meeting or knowingly give false information to any University official. Moreover, no student may have possession of false information (e.g., fake IDs, etc.). Falsification of records, including grades and other academic records, admission materials, housing materials, registration materials, health records, identification cards, signed statements, etc., is also strictly prohibited. In addition, the creation, manufacturing and/or distribution of false identification, whether or not for profit, is strictly prohibited and would be subject for dismissal.

In addition, theft, misappropriation, or misuse of another's StagCard for any purpose is a violation of the Student Conduct Code.

Off-Campus Misconduct

All University policies and the Student Conduct Code apply to all students of the University both on and off campus.  Students cited and/or arrested for criminal offenses (misdemeanor or felony) will be referred to the Office of the Dean of Students. Police or court reports or documents, reports from University officials, or other complaints may be considered when reviewing allegations of off-campus misconduct.

Students living off campus are expected to be considerate of their neighbors and the community at large. They should monitor noise levels within and projecting from their homes, and if they host guests or parties, they should arrange for the quiet and appropriate arrival and departure of their guests.

The standards of conduct will be violated by behavior off campus that results in a neighborhood disturbance. A neighborhood disturbance may occur at the site of a social gathering at an off-campus residence (e.g., loud music or conversation levels) or through activity on the part of those arriving at or leaving a social gathering at an off-campus residence (e.g., littering, property damage, fighting, obscene or disruptive behavior, noise disturbances, etc.).

Standard Sanctions for Off-Campus Misconduct

First Offense:

  • $200 maximum fine and formal warning

Second Offense:

  • $400 maximum fine, disciplinary probation, and loss of off-campus status

Third Offense:

  • Dismissal from the University

Physical Violence, Threat of Force, and Fighting

Physical violence, understood as the use of physical force against another person, is a serious offense.   Physical violence is any physical contact with another person that causes that person bodily harm, intends to cause that person bodily harm, is harassing, or can reasonably be viewed by the person as a source of harm, regardless of whether the behavior was deliberate or unintentional. Physical violence includes, but is not limited to, striking, restraining, shoving, or kicking another individual, or hitting a person with an object thrown or propelled.

Threat of force is an action or behavior, expressed or implied, with or without actual physical contact, which would lead a reasonable person to believe that the actor intended to do the other person physical harm.

Fighting occurs when two or more individuals are engaged in physical attempts to harm each other. Although a student may not have instigated an altercation, a student is responsible for fighting if he or she goes beyond any force necessary to avoid harm and attempts to harm the instigator.

Any violation of this policy may result in dismissal or expulsion from the University.

Recreational Transportation Equipment

Fairfield University prohibits the use of recreational transportation equipment (bicycles, skateboards, hover boards, skates, scooters, segways, other equipment with wheels, etc.) in all buildings on campus, including residence halls.   Individuals using these items outside of buildings are expected to do so in a manner that is appropriate, considerate of others, and considerate of college property.  Items that need to be charged must carry Underwriters’ Laboratory (UL) approval for their power cords in order to be brought/stored in any building.

Right to Privacy

No student shall install or use any device for listening to, observing, photographing, recording, amplifying, transmitting, or broadcasting sounds or events occurring in any place where the individual or group involved has a reasonable expectation of being free from unwanted surveillance, eavesdropping, recording, or observation, unless the student has first obtained the consent of all persons involved. Preapproval from the Department of Public Safety must be sought for the use of Unmanned Aerial Device (UAV), Recreational Aerial Vehicle (RAV) and Drone devices.

Sexual Misconduct

Any behavior that constitutes a sexual offense under this section, or the Sexual Misconduct policy set forth in the "Policies and Procedures" section of this Handbook will result in sanctions up to and including dismissal or expulsion, whether or not criminal charges are filed and without regard to whether the conduct occurred on or off campus. Prohibited conduct includes sexual assault, attempted sexual assault, indecent exposure, voyeurism, or possession or distribution of illegal pornography. In addition, sexual assault and other sexual offenses are illegal under Connecticut criminal statutes and may be prosecuted in a court of law.

Please refer to the Sexual Misconduct Policy contained in the "Policies and Procedures" section of the Student Handbook for a complete description, philosophy, definitions, process, information, and resources.

Solicitation

No student or person representing any company is permitted to offer any product or service for purchase on the campus or in the student residences. Students or student groups are not to solicit funds by letter or in person from individuals, companies, or groups by using the name of the University. Students or student organizations wishing to raise money through raffles and other means for special projects must obtain permission from the Office of Conference & Event Management.

Smoking and other Tobacco Products

Smoking is prohibited in all University buildings and facilities. The use of  electronic cigarettes, vaporizors and hookahs are also prohibited in all University buildings and facilities. Consistent with applicable state law, this prohibition includes all of the student residences (residence halls, townhouses, and apartments). As of March 20, 2017, individuals smoking or using tobacco products must do so in designated smoking areas on campus.  Violations of the smoking policy may result in sanctions including, but not limited to, a fine, an educational activity, and/or community service.

Study Abroad

Fairfield University's Student Conduct Code and the procedures by which it is implemented apply to students studying abroad. Students found responsible for violating University policy, including study abroad policy, are subject to student conduct sanctions including but not limited to immediate withdrawal from the program.

Theft

The attempted or actual theft, sale, or possession of property that does not belong to them (including, but not limited to, such items as dining room equipment, laboratory equipment, furniture, library books, computer materials, etc., as well as the personal property of another student or member of the University community) is prohibited and may result in possible arrest and prosecution by state or federal authorities.

Unauthorized Entry

No person shall enter or attempt to enter any University function or facility without a ticket of admission or proper authorization. In addition, no individual shall enter or attempt to enter a locked building, room, office, or area without proper authorization. Furthermore, unauthorized entrance into or presence in a student room or vehicle is a violation of this policy. Individuals can only enter/exit through the main gate when other campus gates are closed. Violations of this policy may result in a fine and/or formal warning.

Weapons, Knives, Firearms, Fireworks, and Projectiles

All weapons are prohibited on University property. The term "weapons" should be understood to include, but is not limited to, firearms, paint guns, BB guns, air guns, slingshots, bows and arrows, various kinds of knives other than cooking utensils, and various kinds of martial arts devices capable of being used as weapons. Facsimiles, replicas, or reproductions of weapons (e.g., "air soft" guns) are also prohibited. In addition, the possession of fireworks or other dangerous chemicals and propelling any object in such a way as to endanger safety or property are prohibited.

STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS

The dean of students, associate dean, or other members of the dean's staff have broad authority to act in the best interests of students, the community, and the University. To that end, the dean or designee(s) may take immediate action to remove or restrict a student from the University outside of the student conduct process. If the removal or restriction resulted from alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code, a hearing would be scheduled as soon as possible to determine the final disposition in the matter. In matters that are not related to student conduct but rather speak to the health, safety, or welfare of a student or the community, the dean or designee(s) may take whatever action necessary to alleviate that concern, up to and including removing the student from the University.In cases heard by the Student Conduct Board, the Office of the Dean of Students receives the Board's determination of responsibility and recommendations for sanctions. The dean or designee(s) make the final determination. For all student conduct cases, the dean reserves the right to review the determination of responsibility, as well as sanctions.

The Office of the Dean of Students may refer cases that do not rise to the level of a student conduct case, but require some type of resolution or action, to another academic or administrative office or department.  In the dean's absence, the dean may designate another administrator to respond to cases needing immediate attention.

Retaliation against someone who reports an incident or pursues a complaint (or may do so), or witnesses or may be a witness to a reported incident, investigation, or student conduct hearing is prohibited.

Incident Reports

Any member of the University community may report an alleged violation of University policy or the Student Conduct Code if that member observed the violation or had personal knowledge of it through means other than hearsay. Students, administrators, faculty, staff, and other members of the University community who wish to file a report concerning a student's behavior may do so by submitting an Incident Report, or contacting the Department of Public Safety. If the report concerns a member of the faculty, administration, or staff, a duplicate copy of the written report of the incident should be submitted to the person's supervisor.  Reports received from other entities including, but not limited to, the Fairfield Police Department, other colleges and universities, and Town of Fairfield residents may also be used to address alleged violations.

All reports alleging misconduct by a student will be reviewed by the Office of the Dean of Students. If there is sufficient evidence that a University rule or regulation may have been violated, the accused student will be notified of a meeting with the dean's staff. The student is required to keep this appointment. At the initial meeting, the student conduct process will be explained, the student will be advised of the alleged violations, and, if applicable, the student will be given the opportunity to choose a hearing body. If the hearing body chosen or required is an administrative hearing, the initial meeting will progress into a student conduct hearing. If the alleged violations occurred as a group, then a group hearing, rather than an individual hearing, may be held. For first-time, minor infractions, and at the discretion of the Office of the Dean of Students, students may be given the option of confirming their responsibility in writing in lieu of a hearing/meeting with the dean's office. Sanctions will still apply.

Hearings

There are two types of hearings for student conduct cases: (1) administrative hearing (e.g., dean's staff, designee of the dean's office, such as the Office of Residence Life) and (2) board hearing. The Dean of Students delegates members of his or her staff to be the principal administrators of student conduct matters. The dean or another student conduct administrator refers alleged violations to the appropriate type of hearing.

In most cases, alleged violations of policies whose sanctions call for dismissal are referred to the dean of students. The dean of students has the discretion to refer a student to an administrative hearing even when potential sanctions call for dismissal. A student may request an administrative hearing even when the sanctions could entail dismissal or expulsion; however, the dean can deny that request and refer the matter to the Student Conduct Board. Alleged violations of a less serious nature are handled through administrative hearings or may be referred to the Peer Conduct Board.

The student conduct process is intended to serve educational goals as well as to uphold University policies and the Student Conduct Code. The student conduct process should not be confused with criminal or civil court proceedings. As such, student conduct hearings are not courts of law and formal rules of evidence do not apply. Hearings are not open to the public, other members of the University community, parents, family members, or legal counsel. Student conduct cases are decided based upon the standard of whether it was more likely than not that a violation has occurred. The spirit or intent of policy or standard of conduct is taken into consideration. In the determination of sanctions, prior student conduct violations are considered.

Violations of the Student Conduct Code and University policies are sometimes also potential violations of criminal law. The University reserves the right to initiate or proceed with (and in some instances may be required by law to proceed with) the student conduct process against a student, regardless of a pending criminal investigation, charges, arrest, or prosecution arising out of the same or a related factual situation. The dismissal, failure to prosecute, settlement, or reduction in charges of any related criminal matter shall not be grounds for a challenge to any student conduct matter.

Boards

Student Conduct Board

The Student Conduct Board is a hearing body that determines the finding(s) of responsibility for alleged policy or Student Conduct Code violations involving students or student organizations, and issues sanctions if the student or student organization is found responsible including, but not limited to, dismissal from the University. The board is a five-member body consisting of two voting students, one voting academic dean or administrator, one voting faculty member, and a non-voting chairperson. If students or faculty are not available, any University administrator can substitute their position on the board.

Board members are individuals known for their integrity and commitment to the standards governing the University community. Board appointments are made by the senior vice president for student affairs or another University designated official. The faculty representative(s) are nominated by the general faculty and serve three-year terms. Once a faculty member has been appointed to the board, he or she may serve indefinitely as an alternate member. The student members of the board are selected from the Peer Conduct Board. Any member of the board may exempt himself or herself from hearing a case if he or she feels that personal involvement or another conflict of interest may affect his or her judgment. An alternate will then fill the vacancy. If a board member fails to perform his or her responsibilities, the board may request, by a unanimous vote of the other members, that the senior vice president for student affairs or another University designated official terminates the member's appointment and appoint an alternate or new member to fill the vacancy.

Peer Conduct Board

The Peer Conduct Board is selected, trained, and overseen by the Office of the Dean of Students. The Peer Conduct Board serves as a student conduct hearing body composed of students and convenes to hear cases and recommends outcomes to the Office of the Dean of Students.  The Office of the Dean of Students takes the Peer Conduct Board’s recommendations into account when determining outcomes and sanctions. Members of the Peer Conduct Board serve on Student Conduct Hearing Boards.

Off-Campus Board

The Off-Campus Board will work to bring students and neighbors together to address incidents and behavioral concerns that occur off-campus, formulate reasonable solutions, and offer support to one another to achieve peaceful community living.  The format lends to bring involved parties together to deal with harm face-to-face to understand the harm, and make plans to repair the harm through education and action.

The Off-Campus Board will convene when a responsible party is identified as well as when there is not an identified responsible party.  The Off-Campus Board composition will include trained University staff and students, and non-Fairfield University community members.

Board Hearing Procedures

The hearing shall be conducted in accordance with the students' rights published in this Handbook. Unless otherwise provided for and/or required by federal or state law, the responding student may request the assistance of an advisor who is a member of the University community. The chairperson presides over the hearing and determines all procedural matters, and along with other board members, determine the relevance of the testimony and evidence available.

The board members review the available relevant reports, documents, and evidence. The student conduct administrator (or designee) presents the alleged violation(s) and the responding student enters a plea for each alleged violation.  The board begins by questioning the responding student, followed by individuals appearing as witnesses, which may include the reporting party.

The board deliberates in a closed session and determines whether or not the responding student is responsible for the alleged violation(s). The student conduct administrator is available during the deliberations to offer any assistance as requested by the board. A simple majority of the voting board members is sufficient for determining a student's responsibility for any violation. If less than a simple majority vote finds that the student was responsible or the vote results in a tie, the determination shall be that the student is not responsible for the violation(s).

If a student is found responsible for any policy violation(s) the board shall receive the record of any previous student conduct violation(s), sanction(s) and any other information relevant to recommending sanctions. The board then deliberates and votes on a sanctioning recommendation. A simple majority is necessary for all recommended sanctions, with the exception of recommendations to dismiss or expel a student from the University which require a unanimous vote.

Board members are required to maintain confidentiality and shall not discuss student conduct records, votes taken, and hearing proceedings outside of deliberations and in communicating their decision and recommendation to the Office of the Dean of Students.

Peer Mediation

Peer mediation is a voluntary option for students who make informal complaints to the Office of the Dean of Students. The program offers trained student mediators who help other students resolve conflicts. The mediator facilitates communication and helps explore new ideas. The parties to the conflict make all final decisions about the outcome. Students create their own solutions with the mediator's guidance.

Stag Explorers

Stag Explorers is a program that provides an opportunity for first-year students to connect with a Peer Conduct Board member about a low-level Student Conduct Code or university policy violation. This program is offered during the entire academic year and is completely voluntary.

Students who choose this program will participate in non-judgmental, candid dialogue intended to consider the types of decisions they are making in their lives and challenge them to better understand their needs, the needs of the Fairfield community, and implications of further conflicts with policy on their lives within the campus community and beyond.

Appeals

Appeals may be made by the reporting or responding student on the basis of newly discovered evidence that was not available at the time of the original student conduct hearing, or based upon a substantial error in the student conduct proceedings. Severity of the sanction(s) imposed is not grounds for an appeal.

Students may appeal a student conduct outcome within five business days from the date the student is informed of the original decision. The appeal must be submitted in writing to the senior vice president of student affairs or another University designated official. The student shall be advised in writing of the decision on the appeal within 14 business days. If the vice president is unable to respond within 14 business days of the receipt of the appeal, the senior vice president shall notify the student in writing and provide an estimated timeframe in which the appeal will be decided.

An appeal does not postpone the imposition of sanctions. If the appeal is granted, the decision either will be set aside or the senior vice president may send the matter back to the appropriate hearing body for further adjudication. The decision of the senior vice president or another University designated official upon appeal is final.

Student Rights

Fairfield University respects the dignity and rights of each of its students. In all student conduct cases, students are asked to review their rights and are given the opportunity to ask questions.

Rights of the Responding Student

  1. The right to meet with the Office of the Dean of Students to discuss the student conduct process.
  2. The right to review the information against him or her, including the nature of the alleged violations, the documentation of those violations, and the names of adverse witnesses and the information they provided.
  3. The right to respond to the alleged violations and to rebut unfavorable inferences that might be drawn.
  4. The right to present the information of any witness who has direct, personal knowledge of the incident or conduct in question.
  5. Unless otherwise provided for and/or required by federal or state laws, the respondent may request the assistance of an advisor who is a member of the University community (faculty, staff, or fellow student). The advisor serves as a support person and will offer assistance to the student before and during the hearing. The advisor may not address the hearing officer, the Board, or other parties present, nor otherwise participate in the hearing.
  6. The right to be absent from a hearing without excuse. However, the case will be heard without the student present and a decision rendered based upon the evidence or information available.
  7. The student has the right to delay the hearing for up to five business days if a legitimate reason has been established as determined by the dean of students or his/her designee.
  8. The right to be advised of the result of his/her hearing outcome and the rationale for the decision within three business days of the hearing date.

Rights of the Reporting Student (i.e., the complainant)

  1. The right to meet with the Office of the Dean of Students to discuss the student conduct process.
  2. The right to present information and any witness who has direct, personal knowledge of the incident or conduct in question.
  3. The right to be advised of the date, time, and location of the student conduct hearing and to request rescheduling for legitimate reason.
  4. Unless otherwise provided for and/or required by federal or state laws, the respondent may request the assistance of an advisor who is a member of the University community (faculty, staff, or fellow student). The advisor serves as a support person and will offer assistance to the student before and during the hearing. The advisor may not address the hearing officer, the Board, or other parties present, nor otherwise participate in the hearing.
  5. The right to appear as a witness at student conduct hearings.
  6. The right to decline to appear or remain anonymous with knowledge that such action could result in the dismissal of the alleged violations for lack of evidence or information.
  7. The right to submit a written impact statement to the Office of the Dean of Students for consideration while determining sanctions.
  8. Upon written request, the right to be informed of relevant sanctions imposed upon the respondent within three business days of the hearing.
  9. Upon written request, in cases involving crimes of violence as defined by FERPA, the right to be informed of the final results of the University's student conduct code proceedings dealing with that specific incident within three business days of the hearing.  This information may be provided to the next of kin if the reporting student dies as a result of the incident.

Student Conduct Records

Student conduct records are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students. Any student has a right to review and inspect his or her own record.  Effective as of 2007-2008, student conduct records will be maintained for seven years after graduation, anticipated graduation date, or last date of attendance, unless there is sufficient reason to keep a record longer (e.g., pending criminal or civil litigation). In matters resulting in separation from the University (i.e., dismissal or expulsion), or allegations unresolved following the withdrawal of a student, conduct records may be kept indefinitely. 

The Family and Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) defines legitimate access to student records. Student conduct records are not shared beyond the Office of the Dean of Students, except with those at the University with a legitimate "need to know." Student privacy is taken most seriously. In enforcing its policies including its policies of Sexual Misconduct, Fairfield University at times will be governed by state and federal regulations. In these instances of compliance, FERPA is not violated.

FERPA does make exceptions for disseminating information to students' parents or legal guardians. By way of example, parents of students under the age of 21 will be notified of behavior determined to be in violation of Fairfield's alcohol or policies. Such notification occurs at the conclusion of the student conduct process.

Further, the Office of the Dean of Students reserves the right to notify parents or guardians in the event of a health or safety emergency regarding their student. Additionally, upon written request, the Office of the Dean of Students will disclose to the complainant of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense (or the complainant's next of kin if the complainant dies as a result of the crime or offense) the final results of the University's conduct code proceedings dealing with that specific crime or offense.

Release of Student Conduct Records

When a student or former student provides written consent for the University to disclose their student conduct record to a person or entity outside the University, (examples include an application for employment, graduate school, transfer to another University), Fairfield discloses information related to conduct that resulted in the following administrative or academic statuses:  Disciplinary probation, deferred dismissal, dismissal, expulsion, and withdrew with pending alleged violations.  Unless a student or former student otherwise directs the University in writing, or an exception recognized under FERPA applies, Fairfield University does not disclose to persons or entities outside the University student conduct matters that did not result in such outcomes. When the University responds to external conduct record requests, the response includes information explaining the student conduct records release policy. Conduct outcomes other than disciplinary probation, deferred dismissal, dismissal or expulsion are generally not applicable or appropriate for distribution beyond the University community; however, students are encouraged to be forthright if an employer, professional licensure request, etc. asks questions about the student’s conduct at Fairfield University.

Under FERPA, a student may also inspect and review their conduct record by submitting a written request to the Office of the Dean of Students. For more information about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), please visit the Registrar’s webpage

Sanctions

Student conduct sanctions are intended to offer educational correctives to unacceptable behavior. For some infractions, the University has prescribed minimum or maximum sanctions (e.g., violation of alcohol or drug policies). The sanctions imposed will be determined based upon the severity of the infraction, the student's prior record, and any other relevant circumstances. Failure to comply with sanctions is itself a violation of University policy and may result in probation, a hold placed on student records, and/or dismissal.

Interim sanctions may be assigned in order to protect the health, safety, security, and well-being of the University community and its members.  Interim sanction may be imposed at any point during the student conduct process.  These sanctions may be included as part of the final outcome.  Interim sanctions will typically be imposed if the University determines there is:

  1. an ongoing threat to or concern regarding a member of the University community;
  2. an ongoing threat to or concern regarding personal or University property; or
  3. a risk of disruption of or interference with the normal operation of University business.

The University will take reasonable steps to ensure a hearing occurs and a final determination(s) of responsibility is made in a timely manner.  Interim sanctions may remain in effect until a final decision has been reached and appeals have been determined. 

Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to:

Alcohol/Drug Education: Required attendance and participation in wellness classes.

Community Service: A number of hours of service to the University or the community. Service hours must be completed within the imposed timeframe.

Deferred Dismissal: A period of time during which a student is no longer in good standing with the University and will be required to adhere to specific requirements and conditions in order to remain enrolled.  Student will lose housing related privileges including, but not limited to, restriction from housing-related lotteries.  The student cannot hold a leadership position in any recognized student organization or athletic team and will be restricted from participating in University activities, including varsity athletics or club sports, and representing the University.  Parent(s)/Guardian(s) will be notified.  Failure to comply with the requirements or conditions will result in an immediate dismissal from the University for a period of time, and additional sanctions may be applied. Any subsequent violations may also result in dismissal, expulsion, or the loss of other privileges including, but not limited to, on-campus housing or attendance and participation in university programs and activities.

Disciplinary Probation: A probationary status with the University that means the student is not in good standing with the University because of his or her behavior. Disciplinary probation is intended to reflect the seriousness of the student's misconduct. Student will lose housing related privileges including, but not limited to, restriction from housing-related lotteries.  The student cannot hold a leadership position in any recognized student organization or athletic team and may be restricted from participating in University activities, including varsity athletics or club sports, and representing the University.  Parent(s)/Guardian(s) will be notified.  Most importantly, further infractions while on probation will likely result in dismissal or expulsion. Disciplinary probation will continue for a minimum of one full academic semester, unless the student is placed on probation after the halfway point of a particular semester. In those situations, probation will continue for the duration of that semester and one additional full semester. Probationary periods end only with the conclusion of regular academic semesters.

Dismissal: Withdrawal from the University for conduct reasons that is an interruption in progress towards a degree for an indefinite period of time that does allow the student to reapply to the University in the future. Students who have been dismissed from the University will be expected to remain away for at least a full semester (fall or spring).  Parent(s)/Guardian(s) will be notified.  While dismissed, a student may not be on campus, property operated by the University or attend any university-sponsored event for any reason without prior approval from the Office of the Dean of Students and is subject to arrest for trespassing. If a dismissed student has a need to come to campus, a request must be made to and approval given by the Department of Public Safety or the Office of the Dean of Students at least 48 hours in advance. Credits earned at another institution while dismissed cannot be transferred and applied toward a Fairfield degree.

Drug Testing: Random drug testing at the student's expense. The results of such tests will be reported to the Office of the Dean of Students.

Educational Project: A writing assignment or research project related to the unacceptable behavior.

Expulsion: Withdrawal from the University for conduct reasons that is permanent and prohibits the student from reapplying to the University in the future or earning a degree from any of its colleges or schools. Under expulsion, the student is not welcome on campus.

Fines, Fees or Restitution: A payment to the University or to an individual for unacceptable behavior or physical damage caused. Fine monies paid to the University are deposited into a restricted budget, administered by the Office of the Dean of Students, to support student life initiatives. They are not part of the University's general fund. Restitution is used to cover the direct cost associated with repairs or replacement items.

Formal Warning Status: A formal warning will be issued to students who have been found responsible for a policy violation that may not reach a threshold for being placed on disciplinary probation.  Students who are issued formal warnings remain in good disciplinary standing with the University.

Housing Change: A required move from one room to another, from an apartment or townhouse to a residence hall room; a revocation of off-campus or commuter status and return to an on-campus housing location; or a removal from campus housing for a stated period of time. If removed from campus housing, a student may not live in or visit University-owned residences.

Housing Warning: A notice that their current housing status is on probation and any future violation could result in loss of housing, lottery restriction, or change of assignment.

No-Contact Order: An order prohibiting a student from having contact, including but not limited to, physical, written, verbal, third-party, and/or electronic contact, with another student for a specified period of time.

Referrals: A referral for evaluation and/or counseling to individuals or organizations considered helpful to the student. Attendance or participation at such referrals, as well as recommendations for further evaluation or action, will be reported to the Office of the Dean of Students.

Restorative Mentoring: This is a student conduct sanction program that encourages and provides an opportunity for dialogue, reflection, and conversation in the areas of student behavior, moral development, responsible community participation, and our Jesuit mission.  Students meet with the director of restorative mentoring on a regular basis to reflect intentionally about their choices. Students will be encouraged and learn how to make decisions more aligned with our Jesuit mission and their personal values.

Restriction: A restriction from entering a particular residence hall(s), townhouse(s), apartment(s), or an individual floor; or a limitation or restriction on being able to live in townhouses, apartments, or as off-campus boarders, or participating in housing-related lotteries.

Stag Smart: A program that provides an opportunity for students living in an upper-class environment to develop the skills and techniques they need to host smart parties on campus and intervene in situations where their peers are misusing alcohol.

Warning: Notice to a student indicating a behavior has or may have violated University policy or standards, and that repeated behavior and future violations may be subject to further action.

State and Federal Alcohol and Drug Laws

State Law

Connecticut has enacted laws that prohibit the sale, gift, offer, and illegal possession of various types of drugs. These state laws mandate minimum prison sentences, including five years for the manufacture, distribution, sale, gift, offer, or possession with intent to sell any of the following by a non-drug dependent person:

  • one ounce or more of heroin, methadone, or cocaine;
  • one-half gram or more of cocaine in a free-base form;
  • five milligrams or more of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD);
  • any narcotic, hallucinogenic, or amphetamine-type substance (for first-time offenders);
  • one kilogram or more of cannabis-type substance, including marijuana (for first-time offenders).

A conviction of any of the aforementioned offenses involving a minor or occurring within close proximity to an elementary or secondary school, housing project, or day care center elicits even harsher sanctions. These penalties include mandatory sentences in addition to the above mandatory sentences:

  • Two years for the distribution, sale, offer, or gift of any controlled substance to a person under 18 years of age, as long as the provider is at least two years older than the recipient;
  • Three years for the manufacture, distribution, sale, transport, possession with intent to sell, dispensation, offer, or gift of any controlled substance within 1,500 feet of an elementary school, housing project, or day care center;
  • Three years for employing, hiring, using, persuading, inducing, enticing, or coercing a person under 18 years of age to violate a drug-related statute.

In addition to the aforementioned laws regarding the manufacture and distribution of drugs, Connecticut has enacted strict penalties for the illegal possession of drugs. First-time offenders may be sentenced up to seven years in prison and/or fined not more than $50,000 for the possession of any quantity of a narcotic, including cocaine, morphine, or heroin. Possession of any quantity of a hallucinogen, such as LSD, or of four ounces or more of marijuana, may result in a sentence of up to five years in prison and/or a $2,000 fine. One year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine is authorized for the possession of less than four ounces of marijuana or any quantity of other controlled substances, such as amphetamines or barbiturates.

A conviction for the possession of drugs within 1,500 feet of an elementary or secondary school or day care center will result in three years of imprisonment. This penalty is in addition to any other penalties and consecutive to any other terms of imprisonment that may be imposed.

Connecticut has also enacted laws regarding the distribution, possession, and consumption of alcohol. One such law prohibits the sale, shipment, delivery, or gift of alcoholic liquor to a minor. The penalty for this crime includes up to 18 months in prison and/or a fine of not more than $1,500. Any person who induces a minor to procure alcohol from an authorized seller of alcohol faces up to one year imprisonment and/or a fine not to exceed $1,000. Furthermore, a fine of between $200 and $500 and/or 30 days imprisonment may be imposed for using a fake or altered personal identification, using another person's identification, or making a false statement in connection with the attempt to purchase alcohol. Any minor who possesses alcohol in a public place may be fined between $200 and $500, unless that minor is accompanied by a guardian or spouse at the time of possession or possesses the alcohol by order of a physician.

Connecticut has also enacted drunk driving laws that are strictly enforced. Individuals may not operate a vehicle when they are under the influence of any drug or alcohol. A person may be convicted if he operates a motor vehicle while having an "elevated blood alcohol content," which means a ratio of alcohol in the blood of .08% or higher, by weight. A first conviction for driving under the influence mandates a fine of between $500 and $1,000, imprisonment of between 48 hours and 6 months, of which 48 hours is a mandatory minimum, and suspension of driving privileges for one year. Subsequent conviction of driving under the influence within 10 years after a prior conviction for the same offense could result in fines of between $1,000 and $4,000, imprisonment of 120 days to two years, of which 120 days is a mandatory minimum, and suspension of driving privileges for three years.

Laws are constantly enacted and revised. Recent revisions and additions to the Connecticut General Statutes may be found online at www.cslib.org/psaindex.htm. Students should refer to this resource, as well as the Connecticut General Statutes, for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

Federal Law

The United States has enacted drug trafficking laws and penalties, which are contained in Title 21 of the United States Code. These laws impose sanctions (outlined below) for the manufacture, distribution, possession with intent to manufacture or distribute, and simple possession of drugs.

These penalties may be doubled when any of the aforementioned acts are committed within 1,000 feet of an elementary, secondary, or vocational school; a college, junior college, or university; or a playground or public housing facility. The penalties may be doubled if the act is committed within 100 feet of a youth center, public swimming pool, or video arcade. Penalties may also be doubled when an individual over the age of 18 distributes drugs to a person under 21; employs, uses, induces, or coerces a person under 18 to violate federal drug laws or to assist the individual to avoid detection for his own violations of federal drug laws; or receives drugs from a person under 18 who is not an immediate family member.

Penalties may be tripled if an individual over 21 years of age coerces a person under 18 to distribute, possess with intent to distribute or manufacture, or assist the individual to do the same, a drug within 1,000 feet of an elementary, secondary, or vocational school; a college, junior college, or university or playground or public housing facility. Penalties may be tripled if the act is committed within 100 feet of a youth center, public swimming pool, or video arcade.

Distribution of a drug by one who is over 18 to a person under 18 can result in a prison sentence of up to five years and/or a fine of not more than $50,000. Finally, conspiracy to commit any of the above drug-related offenses carries the same penalties regardless of whether the conspiracy is successful.

Updates regarding federal drug trafficking laws can be found at the Drug Enforcement Agency's website at www.usdoj.gov/dea/index.htm.

Finding Help with Regard to Alcohol, Drugs, Eating Disorders, or Gambling

There are many resources where students can seek help. Following is a list of University offices and other organizations that can help students with questions about or problems with alcohol, drugs, eating disorders, and gambling.

Alcohol and Other Drugs

The extent of drinking and drug use on campus varies widely, and many college students do not abuse alcohol or drugs. Nevertheless, alcohol and drugs are part of many college environments, and when coupled with other risky behaviors, can be problematic for students. There are many resources both on campus and off where students can find assistance for these issues.

University Resources

Counseling & Psychological Services *
John C. Dolan Hall
203-254-4000, ext. 2146

Fairfield University Substance Abuse Program includes substance abuse assessments and group experiences
203-254-4000, ext. 4166

Campus Ministry *
Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola
203-254-4000, ext. 2550

Office of the Dean of Students
Barone Campus Center, 4th floor
203-254-4211

* On-call 24-hours a day, seven days a week for emergencies, and can be reached through the Department of Public Safety at 203-254-4090

Off-Campus Resources

Fairfield Counseling Services
125 Penfield Road
Fairfield, CT 06824
203-255-5777

Alcoholics Anonymous
203-333-5804
www.aa.org

Narcotics Anonymous
800-627-3543
www.na.org

Eating Disorders

Health care professionals from the Health Center and Counseling & Psychological Services develop and oversee an individualized treatment plan and a range of integrated services for students with Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, compulsive overeating, over-exercising and body image concerns. Services include individual therapy, medical monitoring (vital signs, weight, blood work) nutrition counseling, psychiatric assessments, medication management, and community referrals.

University Resources

Eating Disorder Treatment Team
Counseling & Psychological Services
203-254-4000, ext. 2146

Student Health Center
203-254-4000, ext. 2241

Off-Campus Resources

Call Counseling & Psychological Services at 203-254-4000, ext. 2146 for local referrals

Gambling

Gambling can lead to significant problems and even addiction. Signs of problem gambling include gambling alone, minimizing and concealing the extent of gambling, or arguing with family members about financial difficulties. Help is available for problem gambling. Treatment options may involve a combination of individual/group therapy, family therapy, financial recovery counseling, and/or psychiatric medications. Sufferers can reduce the role of gambling in their lives and learn to cope with their problems more productively.

University Resources

Counseling & Psychological Services
John C. Dolan Hall
203-254-4000, ext. 2146

Off-Campus Resources

Positive Directions
420 Post Road, West
Westport, CT 06880
203-227-7644, ext. 126

Gambler's Anonymous
Hotline: 1 800-266-1908
www.gamblersanonymous.org

Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling
47 Clapboard Hill Road
Guilford, CT 06437
203-453-0138

Help Line: 800-34-NOBET
www.ccpg.org