Bloomberg Businessweek names Charles F. Dolan School of Business among best undergraduate business schools in U.S.


Image: Dolan School of BusinessBloomberg Businessweek recently named Fairfield University's Charles F. Dolan School of Business among its top 100 undergraduate business schools in the nation. The selection comes after the Dolan School applied to be a part of the distinguished list for the first time.

The news comes on the heels of the school maintaining its AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) accreditation, and the appointment of a new dean, Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., a faculty member who has been serving as interim dean for the past two years.

"Being in the top 100 is an important recognition of the School's accomplishments," said Dr. Gibson, dean and professor of management. "We are ranked at number 83 - excellent for our first time on this much anticipated annual list."

The methodology for the rankings included nine measures of student satisfaction, post-graduation outcomes, employer/recruiter opinion, and academic quality that takes in consideration criteria like the amount of business majors with internships. The Dolan School rated an "A" grade by students for teaching quality, and scored well as a "feeder" to highly ranked MBA graduate programs.

Working with the faculty on a new vision and strategic plan, the School is focused on cultivating career-ready students in a vibrant learning community that is known and respected by important stakeholders. Appearing on the Bloomberg/Businessweek list, noted Gibson, is a strong step in increasing market awareness of the school. The profile of the Dolan School notes that students at the Jesuit institution are educated to be thoughtful, ethical leaders who also take into account others while in their professional pursuits.

Image: Dolan School of BusinessAs the profile further notes, "At the undergraduate level, in addition to their business coursework, students benefit from Fairfield's robust arts and humanities core, which provides a well-rounded, socially and culturally relevant educational opportunity. This rich learning experience, coupled with a dedicated internship office and a variety of study abroad options, enable Dolan undergraduates to enter the marketplace well-prepared and with distinct competitive advantages."

One student surveyed spoke of small class sizes resulting in a nurturing learning environment, as well as the ability to "build relationships" with professors.

In the career section, it was pointed out that the largest area of employment (47%) of Dolan School graduates is in financial services. PricewaterCoopers and Deloitte are among the top employers. The average starting salary for grads is $51,884.

Singled out as top areas of study were accounting, finance, general management, international business, marketing and entrepreneurship.

Working with a strong and diverse faculty, along with school staff, alumni, and business community, Dr. Gibson is overseeing a school that has experienced impressive growth in recent years. Its popular Professional Development Series continues to add programs in an effort to make students "career ready."

Bloomberg Businessweek offers a global perspective and comprehensive insights to help senior executives. View the magazine's full list. For more information about the Dolan School of Business, which was recently named to U.S. News & World Report's list of best undergraduate business schools, visit http://www.fairfield.edu/dsb/index.html.

 

Image: The Dolan School of Business - named to Bloomberg Businessweek's list of top 100 undergraduate business programs - offers a multitude of professional development opportunities. Here students competed in the 2nd annual Business Plan Competition, which is part of the school's growing Entrepreneurship Program. (The winning teams were 'SenseFit' and 'inCognito Climate Controlled Hats.')

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Media Contact: Meg McCaffrey, (203) 254-4000, ext. 2726, mmccaffrey@fairfield.edu

Posted on April 18, 2013

Vol. 45, No. 268