Joseph Berardino to be keynote speaker October 28 at business professional Communion Breakfast


Bishop William E. Lori will celebrate a Mass for business professionals and leaders, recognizing their significant contributions in implementing Catholic social doctrine, at 9 a.m. on Sunday October 28, in Fairfield University's Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola. The Mass will be immediately followed by a communion breakfast at the John A. Barone Campus Center Oak Room.

Joseph Berardino, former Chief Executive Officer of Andersen Worldwide and Chairman and CEO of Profectus BioSciences, a biotechnology company actively seeking to eradicate the HIV/Aids virus, will deliver the keynote communion breakfast speech. A trustee and alumnus of Fairfield University, Joe has filled all the seats in the boardroom - auditor, CEO and Non-executive Chairman and lobbied extensively in Congress and testified before Congress and the SEC. Joe believes the most important question senior executives most need to discern is "Whose am I," a question his Jesuit education (Fairfield) and his daughters' Jesuit education (Boston College and Georgetown) have prepared him for. He will discuss the trends in Corporate governance that have led to the discussions in today's Board rooms and how his professional journey has been formed by his Catholic faith.

Robert Wright, Vice Chairman of the Board and Executive Officer of General Electric Company, and Former CEO of NBC Universal, Inc., will respond to Joe's talk, sharing his insights about the challenges facing people in business today. Along with his wife, Suzanne, Bob serves as co-founder of Autism Speaks, a new initiative dedicated to raising public awareness and research funds to find the answers to autism. He holds degrees from the College of the Holy Cross and the University of Virginia School of Law. In October 2005, The Charles F. Dolan School of Business at Fairfield University named the Robert C. Wright Chair in Business Law, Ethics and Dispute Resolution in his honor.

The event is being co-sponsored by Fairfield University's Center for Faith and Public Life and the Fairfield County Chapter of Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice ("CAPP"), a lay-led Vatican organization founded by Pope John Paul II for education and evangelization of Catholic social doctrine through business, professional and academic leaders.

The mission of both organizations is to increase the awareness, understanding and implementation of Catholic Social Teaching ("CST") so participants in the public arena are well prepared to engage in an active and constructive dialogue about important issues of the day.

Catholic Social Teaching, considered by some to be one of the best kept secrets in the Church, is a set of principles for reflection to evaluate the framework of society and to provide criteria for prudential judgment and direction for current policy and action. The primary cornerstones are the inherent Dignity of the Human Person, Solidarity and Subsidiarity.

Responding to the growing global awareness of the influence of religion on public affairs and fostering its Jesuit philosophy, Fairfield University created the Center for Faith and Public Life in November 2005, naming Rev. Richard Ryscavage, S.J, as Director. The Center sponsors a cross-disciplinary forum for students, scholars, policy makers and religious leaders to converse and reflect on the many issues where religion intersects with civic life. The Center acts as a focal point where local, national, and international activities that link faith and public life may be addressed, including such eminent issues as immigration, politics and religion, and civic engagement.

Couples welcome. Seating limited. Tickets are $35 per person. For additional information please contact Jocelyn Collen at (203) 254-4000 ext. 3415 or jcollen@mail.fairfield.edu

Contact: Robert Rooney, President CAPP Fairfield County Chapter (203) 862-8914 or Rev. Richard Ryscavage, S.J., Fairfield University (203) 254-4000, ext. 3415

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Media Contact: Nancy Habetz, (203) 254-4000, ext. 2647, nhabetz@fairfield.edu

Posted on October 3, 2007

Vol. 40, No. 51