The Walsh Art Gallery at the Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts welcomes 2007 with an important multicultural art exhibit


The Thomas J. Walsh Art Gallery at the Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts begins the New Year with an intensely vital and important exhibit of multicultural Latin American artwork: "Multiple Visions -Traveling Art Boxes from Argentina, Mexico and Uruguay." The exhibit opens Friday, Jan. 26, 2007 and closes Sunday, March 11, 2007. There will be an opening reception at the Gallery from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 26. As a bonus to the exhibit, curator Graciela Kartofel, will expand on the development and impact of the work and "why, the box?" when she delivers the Director's Choice Lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 7 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Gallery.

The exhibit features nearly 100 pieces including drawings, paintings, mixed media, photography, objects - some in relief - video and video installation. The work represents the "multiple visions" of more than 20 artists born in different cities in Argentina, Mexico and Uruguay.

Diana Mille, Ph.D., Director of the Walsh Art Gallery, points out that the exhibit "produces testimonies for the survival of diversity by revealing the artistic terrain through which this might be accomplished." She continues the thread of her thought by saying, "the participating artists so vividly present a mesh of high and low culture – intellectual and popular expression – that they make it difficult to deny our role in accepting responsibility for promoting the celebration of diversity."

According to curator Kartofel, there is a world belief that Latin America offers only magical realism, narrative and indigenous figurative images. The precision of geometry and its influence on early indigenous art is often forgotten until one studies the ancient paintings and reliefs of the pre-Columbian period. "Multiple Visions" presents several versions of the contemporary expression of this ancient style. Some of the participating artists have been moved to set aside the usual vivid colors associated with their heritage and express themselves in the blacks, greys and rich earth tones that are also part of home. The use of these stark and sensual colors adds a dimension not often thought of in the context of Latin America. The pieces chosen for this exhibit depict feelings that arise in places where complexity and naiveté go hand in hand and multiculturalism flourishes within the art world.

Curator Kartofel emphasizes the notion that, "while these artists have an inner respect for the rituals of their cultures, they also absorb changes of the moment and at accelerated rhythms. Through this multi-faceted approach, they set the pace for the coming expressions of culture."

Admission to the exhibit is free, including the Jan. 26 opening reception. The gallery is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. For more information, call (203) 254-4000, ext. 2969. Admission to the Director's Choice lecture is $5 and participants are encouraged to bring a brown-bag lunch and beverages.

Bookmark and Share

Media Contact: Nancy Habetz, (203) 254-4000, ext. 2647, nhabetz@fairfield.edu

Posted on January 12, 2007

Vol. 39, No. 121