University College at Fairfield University offers two New York walking tours


The weather is temperate, the sky is blue, and spring is here. What better way to spend a beautiful Saturday afternoon than to explore New York's rich ethnic and architectural past? University College at Fairfield University will host two New York Walking Tours this season.

On Saturday, April 17, at 2 p.m., participants will discover the history and architecture of the Murray Hill neighborhood of New York City. Participants will visit the Sniffen Court Historic District, walk past Franklin D. and Eleanor Roosevelt's first home, and see the original site of Tiffany's. Both a visual and learning experience, walkers will find out about the first baseball game in America and learn the history of the brownstone. Walkers will stop at 16 New York City and 11 national landmarks along the way.

Visit the Lower East Side and learn about Jewish Heritage on Saturday, May 22, at 2 p.m. This tour will focus on the history of 19th Century Jewish immigration and the history and architecture of the Yiddish Rialto. Walkers will see the sites of former Yiddish theatres and synagogues, as well as walk past existing synagogues, Shearith Israel's first cemetery in New York, the original Henry Street settlement houses, and visit the Second Avenue Deli. These are just a few of the landmark stops on this cultural and historical tour.

The cost for each tour is $50, or $99 for both. Comfortable shoes are a must. Participants will meet their guide at a pre-determined location in New York for the tour. Lunch is included in the price. Tours last approximately 3 hours and are limited to 20 participants. To register by phone, call (203) 254-4288. For more information, call (203) 254-4307 or visit University College at www.fairfield.edu. Media inquiries can be made to Dana Ambrosini, assistant director of media relations at Fairfield University, at (203) 254-4000, ext. 2726.

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Media Contact: Nancy Habetz, (203) 254-4000, ext. 2647, nhabetz@fairfield.edu

Posted on March 8, 2004

Vol. 36, No. 184