Image of faculty member, Michael Serazio

Dr. Michael Serazio

Assistant Professor of Communication
mserazio@fairfield.edu
o: Donnarumma Hall Rm 223
p: x2839
Faculty Website

 

The social-media side of war

Dr. Michael Serazio, assistant professor of communications, said that, from Matthew Brady's photos of Civil War battlefields to the Vietnam War in U.S. living rooms via the nightly news, media accounts of war "collapse the time and space of experiencing distant events," making war ever more immediate and accessible. "And each time a new technology emerges," he said, "it seems to bring us closer and closer to the front."

Published in the Philadelphia Inquirer on 7/20/14


GOP's "anti-establishment" conjob: A cynical gambit to secretly talk about class

In an essay for Salon, Dr. Michael Serazio, assistant professor of communication, takes on the use and misuse of the term "anti-establishment" in current political discourse.

Published in Salon on 6/21/14


Quizzes are free data mining tools for brands

Dr. Michael Serazio, assistant professor of communication and author of Your Ad Here: The Cool Sell of Guerilla Marketing, explained the plethora of quizzes found on facebook these days. "It's a way to announce something about ourselves to our friends within our social network, but it's not quite so gauche or obvious to come off as narcissistic," he said.

Published and broadcast on NPR's Marketplace on 3/18/14


Apple's new ad: Don't worry about jobs, follow your passion!

Dr. Michael Serazio, assistant professor of communication, considers Apple's new "Your Verse" ad juxtaposed against a still struggling economy. "Much like Apple's earliest ads, 'Your Verse' isn't selling a product so much as a lifestyle - a better way of living - but on a deeper level it reflects America's anxiety amidst a sluggish, jobless recovery," he wrote.

Published in The New Republic on 1/15/14


OK, Boston, congrats. But who won the World Series of fans?

Dr. Michael Serazio, assistant professor of communication, offered his thoughts on the power of fandom during the World Series.

Appeared on NPR Marketplace on 10/30/13