Image of faculty member, Lynn Babington

Dr. Lynn Babington

Dean for the School of Nursing
lbabington@fairfield.edu
o: School of Nursing Rm 104
p: x2701

 

RWJF Milestones

Fairfield University has appointed Lynn Babington, PhD, MN, RN, its senior vice president for academic affairs. Babington has served as Fairfield's dean of the School of Nursing since 2012...

Published in Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Human Capital blog on 6/23/14


Hospitals to ask about veteran status

Nursing schools are also teaching their students to ask patients if they are veterans. Lynn Babington, dean of Fairfield University's School of Nursing pointed out that "the health care needs of veterans and their families are different from the needs of the general population." She said if a patient isn't asked about military service, potential connected health issues could be overlooked. "You wouldn't know unless the patient brought it up," she said.

Published in The New Haven Register, Connecticut Post, Hearst Newspapers, CTNow on 6/22/14


A patient's-eye-view of nurses

Lynn Babington, Ph.D., RN, professor and dean of Fairfield's School of Nursing, posted a comment on this intriguing article by Lawrence K. Altman, M.D., about Dr. Arnold S. Relman, the eminent former medical educator and editor. In it, Dr. Altman wrote, 'Despite decades as a medical educator, researcher, author and editor of The New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Relman confesses that he "had never before understood how much good nursing care contributes to patients' safety and comfort, especially when they are very sick or disabled." Dr. Babington responded: Dr. Relman, a national leader in medical education, in a recent article about his experience as a patient, writes about his recent discovery of the importance of nursing care to the safety and recovery of patients. He specifically states, he "had never before understood how much good nursing care contributes to patients' safety and comfort, especially when they are very sick or disabled." He also noted, "What personal care hospitalized patients now get is mostly from nurses. When nursing is not optimal, patient care is never good." In fact, nurses go beyond making suggestions to physicians in the care of patients. Nurses, especially in the acute care setting, are in the best position to observe changes in patient's conditions, make decisions and provide interventions to not only prevent physical decline, but to augment healing and recovery. In nursing education today, students study physical assessment, pathophysiology and pharmacology, along with the basic sciences, so that they can recognize changing patient conditions and either implement immediate interventions to respond to those conditions or call in the patient care team, including the physician, to change the course of treatment for patients. Many patients and families do not recognize the importance of those very specialized assessment skills that nurses use every day. For example, a post operative patient may be progressing as planned, but when the nurse is speaking with the patient, she (and most nurses are women) may recognize that the patient has begun sweating and displaying agitation. The nurse will take the patient's blood pressure, check the heart rate and respiratory rate and note any changes from the last time these were recorded. She will check the wound site for redness, tenderness and any changes. Based on her assessments, she will contact the patient care team, including the physician, to discuss these findings (a potential infection or drug reaction) and seek appropriate interventions to prevent the patient from deteriorating. Nursing knowledge and assessment skills, along with communication skills, are essential to the safe recovery of patients. Nurses are at the bedside 24 hours a day, while physicians typically "check in" on a patient once or twice a day. The collaboration of the entire team has never been more important.

Published in The New York Times on 2/10/14


Fairfield University faculty published in Journal of Catholic Higher Education

This issue took a special focus on Catholic higher education and nursing. It included articles by Fairfield faculty: 'Integrative Nursing and Health Sciences Initiatives for the 21st Century: Vision and Pedagogy at One Jesuit University,' by Suzanne Hetzel Campbell, Robbin D. Crabtree, Patrick Kelly 'Service-Learning Initiatives in Nursing Education,' by Eileen O'Shea, Jessica Planas, Melissa Quan, Lydia Greiner, Meredith Kazer, Lynn Babington.

Published in The Journal of Catholic Higher Education (JCHE), the peer-reviewed, semiannual journal of the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities