Jesuit Universities Humanitarian Action Network (JUHAN)

Faculty | Students | Conferences | Enduring Questions

The Jesuit Universities Humanitarian Action Network (JUHAN) was launched in 2008 through a joint collaboration between Georgetown, Fordham and Fairfield Universities on the premise that in addressing the needs of those that are suffering, our academic institutions can be more effective when working together rather than independently. The founders had come to the realization that there is relatively little going on in U.S. higher education to prepare undergraduates for humanitarian action - whether that be career development or preparation to fulfill everyday civic responsibilities.

JUHAN seeks to advance both undergraduate humanitarian education and the professional field of humanitarian action by:

  • bringing students into the professional field at an early stage in their education;
  • forming an educated citizenry - for those students that are not pursuing careers in humanitarian action, JUHAN will provide them with the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill their responsibilities as engaged citizens.
  • developing an educational program that places emphasis on the ethical dimensions of humanitarian action, an area not given enough attention in the professional field.

On each campus, the JUHAN project involves:

  • Leadership teams consisting primarily of students with a faculty and/or staff resource person charged with raising awareness on their respective campuses about humanitarian issues and working toward strategies for response to various types of humanitarian crises
  • Academic courses that focus on humanitarian issues from various disciplines
  • National skill-building conferences for undergraduate students of Jesuit universities

The Fairfield University JUHAN chapter is housed within the Center for Faith and Public Life, hosts an active student group, and designates several courses each semester as JUHAN courses.

Syria

The Dialogue on Syria took place on Nov. 14, 2013 at Fairfield University, sponsored by the Muslim Student Association and Jesuit Universities Humanitarian Action Network (JUHAN) which is housed in the Center for Faith and Public Life.

The civil war in Syria has its roots in sectarian loyalties, fueled by an autocratic dictator and neighboring countries with diverging agendas. The result of the almost-three-year conflict has been a laundry list of humanitarian crises: an enormous refugee problem, deaths due to lack of food and medicine, reports of torture, and the use of chemical weapons. This dialogue helped increase awareness and deepened the discussion about one of the most pressing humanitarian emergencies in the world today.

Check out the videos, below for talks by some of our experts:

Marcie Patton : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFf28E1wWh8
Silvia Marsans-Sakly - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IemkNpVsuuw
David McFadden: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLcUynQ0UpE
Gary Shaye - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPhCIUa6wvQ
Iman Jebara: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKYM42Y_D50
Q&A - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKaE-iNF8MI

Enduring Questions Project

In June 2013, Fairfield University’s Center for Faith and Public Life was awarded a three year grant for its project “Collaborative Project in Student Learning: The Examination of Enduring Questions through Humanitarian Education.” The project will use humanitarian action and “JUHAN” (Jesuit Universities Humanitarian Action Network) as a platform to integrate civic and moral responsibility into the undergraduate curriculum at three Jesuit institutions of higher education - Fairfield University, Georgetown University (GU) and Universidad Centroamericana (UCA)  in Nicaragua - in an effort to equip students to deal more effectively with some of the large clusters of “great questions” of meaning and value, and of moral responsibility. This project will build on the previous three-year collaborative grant, “Value-Added Assessment for the Systematic Improvement of Student Learning,” also funded by the Teagle Foundation. Read more about the Enduring Questions project.